Gentry Indigo Bush - Illustration by Bill Singleton

Gentry Indigo Bush
Dalea tentaculoides

D. tentaculoides is a shrubby perennial herb growing from a woody root crown.1 It can grow up to six and a half feet tall, but usually remains shorter. Young branches are green and turn brown with age. The leaves are compound, with nine to seventeen leaflets.2 The flowers are small, pea-like, and rose-purple in color.1

Habitat: D. tentaculoides grows on canyon bottoms at elevations ranging from 3600 to 4400 feet.2 The plant occurs in disturbance prone environments, and is subject to periodic flooding.1

Range: This species occurs in southern Arizona and may extend into Mexico. The plant has been found in several locations in Pima and Santa Cruz Counties, and one population has been found in Mexico.3 Historically, the species had been found in the Coyote and Baboquivari Mountains in Pima County.4

Status: D. tentaculoides is a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service "Species of Concern." In January 2002, the Center for Biological Diversity filed a petition to list the Gentry Indigo Bush as an endangered species. It is protected under the Arizona Native Plant Law and considered "sensitive" by the Regional Forester.

Gentry indigo bush in Pima County: The majority of D. tentaculoides range falls within Pima County. Threats to this species includes grazing, trampling of plants by recreationists, and flooding.1 Two populations of D. tentaculoides have been found on the Tohono O'odham Reservation.2 The Baboquivari Mountains have been identified as a priority conservation area for this species.5

References:

1. New Mexico Game and Fish. 1998. Dalea tentaculoides. Heritage Data Management System.

2. Desert Botanical Garden. 1999. "Dalea tentaculoides Gentry Indigo Bush." 12/22/99 Web site: www.dbg.org/index.htm

3. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 1998. "Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Notice of Reclassification of Four Candidate Taxa." Federal Register. 63(63). Pp. 16217-16218.

4. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 1992. Handbook of Arizona's Endangered, Threatened, and Candidate Plants. Pp. 3

4. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 1992. Handbook of Arizona's Endangered, Threatened, and Candidate Plants. Pp. 36.

5. RECON. 2001. Priority Vulnerable Species. Pima County Administration

6. Dalea tentaculoides. Heritage Data Management System.


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