November 8, 2005 Update

 

 

TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 11 EAST, PIMA COUNTY, ARIZONA

Gila and Salt River Baseline and Meridian

 

 

Major Contributor and Source of Information: William T. Kendall. Southwest Environmental Information Network (SEINet).

 

 

Species Distribution Lists are being developed to encourage and promote the conservation of local native animals and plants. They are developed for legally defined geographic areas, and larger bodies of water. They are provided to environmental consultants, property owners, and government agencies interested in promoting conservation. Listings include species reported as having been observed in or reported from the described area.

 

Due to continuing additions and corrections the listings should be considered a work in progress. Species once reported as having occurred within the described area, but that no longer occurs there are shown are having been EXTIRPATED. This list includes species that are not native to Arizona (EXOTIC). Exotic plants are not recommended for use in landscaping or restoration projects. Disjunct species, outliers and plants on the edge of the main population, as observed by the surveyor, are noted as being PERIPHERAL PLANT(S). Landscaped plants are not included in the lists unless they have become naturalized in the surrounding native environment.

 

Local native vegetation is recommended for use in landscaping and restoration projects. To determine what could be considered as local native vegetation look at both the project township and the eight contiguous townships for plants of similar habitat and elevation. Plants should be planted in their approximate original habitat and density. Use of native plants encourages native animals to remain in the area and helps to retain the areas natural beauty, unique identity and heritage.

 

Appreciation is expressed to the officers and staff of the Arizona Department of Agriculture, the Arizona Game and Fish Department, Pima County and local government offices for the protection provided to our native animals and plants.

 

Species Distribution Lists are periodically updated and revised. These listings have been created and maintained by William T. Kendall. Comments, the reporting of corrections, the reporting of unrecorded species in townships and the reporting of information relating to the historical distribution of species would be greatly appreciated, and may be sent by mail to: Kendall Environmental Surveys, P.O. Box 87967, Tucson, Arizona 85754-7967, or E-mail to: KendallEnvironmentalSurveys@msn.com.

 

 

DISCLAIMER: The information presented as township notes has been obtained from large scale mapping and should be used only as a general guide. Information used in these lists is accepted from biologists and individuals interested in helping to promote the conservation of our natural resources. Mistakes are made in the identification of species and in the recording of information, and changes in nomenclature occur. For these reasons I can not and do not warrant the accuracy of these listings.

 

 

CAUTION: Many native desert plants have sharp thorns and spines. Care should be given when handling them and consideration should be given to public safety at sites where they are to be planted.

 

 

 

This photograph was taken looking north into the Sierrita Mountains. A few of the plants reported from this township that might be useful in landscaping and restoration include Gray Oak (Quercus grisea), Alligator Juniper (Juniperus deppeana), Velvet Mesquite (Prosopis velutina), Border Pinyon (Pinus discolor), Netleaf Oak (Quercus rugosa), Desert Willow (Chilopsis linearis subsp. arcuata), Ocotillo (Fouquieria splendens), Tahitian Kidneywood (Eysenhardtia orthocarpa), Desert Hackberry (Celtis pallida), Catclaw Acacia (Acacia greggii var. greggii), Wright Silktassel (Garrya wrightii), Greythorn (Ziziphus obtusifolia var. canescens), Common Sotol (Dasylirion wheeleri), Fishhook Barrel Cactus (Ferocactus wislizeni), Hop Bush (Dodonaea viscosa), Bear Grass (Nolina microcarpa), Santa Rita Pricklypear Cactus (Opuntia santa-rita), Catclaw Mimosa (Mimosa aculeaticarpa var. biuncifera), Turpentine Bush (Ericameria laricifolia), Velvetpod Mimosa (Mimosa dysocarpa), Plains Bristlegrass (Setaria vulpiseta), Woolyspike Balsamscale (Elionurus barbiculmis), Sideoats Grama (Bouteloua curtipendula), Slender Janusia (Janusia gracilis), Fairyduster (Calliandra eriophylla var. eriophylla:), Schott Agave (Agave schottii var. schottii), Scarlet Bouvardia (Bouvardia ternifolia), Arizona Rainbow Cactus (Echinocereus rigidissimus), Ragged Nettlespurge (Jatropha macrorhiza), Summer Poppy (Kallstroemia grandiflora), Desert Zinnia (Zinnia acerosa), Bisbee Beehive Cactus (Escobaria vivipara var. bisbeeana), Leatherweed (Croton pottsii), Hairyseed Bahia (Bahia absinthifolia),  Desert Holly (Acourtia nana), Graham Pincushion Cactus (Mammillaria grahamii var. grahamii) and Desert Fluff Grass (Dasyochloa pulchella). WTK August 2005

 

 

Township Notes

 

Location: This township is located in southeastern Pima County in south-central Arizona. The community of McGees Settlement is located in this township. Named mining sites include the Blackhawk Mine and Fortuna Mine. Named ranches, tanks and wells include the Ash Creek Tank, Black Hawk Tank, Champurrado Tank, Champurrado Well, Chimney Tank, Dons Tank, George Tank, Homestead Tank, Horse Tank, Keystone Tank, Kidoo Tank, Lobo Well, Lower Ash Creek Tank, Ox Frame Tank, Ranch Tank, San Juan Tank, Shloh Well, Sierrita Well, South Tank, Tios Tank, Twin Ponds, and Upper Ash Creek Tank.

 

Landmarks: The central portion of the Sierrita Mountains is located in this township. Named canyons, hills and peaks include Horse Pasture Hill (5,382 feet), Keystone Peak (6,188 feet), Lobo Peak (4,951 feet), Ox Frame Canyon, Placer Peak, Red Boy Peak (6,045 feet), Ritchey Peak (5,144 feet), Tascuela Canyon and White Iron Canyon. Named springs and washes include Ash Creek, Banner Wash, Bills Spring, Cerro Prieto Wash, Champurrado Wash. Escondido Wash, Proctor Wash and San Juan Wash.

 

Elevation: Elevations range from approximately 3,737 feet in the Champurrado Wash at the southwest corner to approximately 6,188 feet at Keystone Peak southwest of the northwest corner. (1).

 

Physiographic Province: This township is located within the Sonoran Desert Section of the Basin and Range Physiographic Province (2).

 

Soil: Soils are described as thermic (hot) arid and semiarid soils of the White House-Bernardino-Caralampi Association (deep, semiarid soils on uplands) and the Rock Outcrop-Lampshire-Cellar Association (rock outcrops and very shallow and shallow semiarid soils of the mountains and foothills). (3).

 

Biotic Community: Portions of this township are located within the Scrub-Grassland (Semidesert Grassland) Regional Formation of the Grassland Formation and Madrean Evergreen Woodland of the Woodland Formation with associated Wetlands. (4)

 

 

Maps created with TOPO! R C 2002 National Geographic

 

Map of Township Showing Adjacent Sections

 

 

The ARIZONA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY

http://aznps.org/

 

The ARIZONA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY is a statewide nonprofit organization devoted to Arizona's native plants. Its mission is to promote knowledge, appreciation, conservation, and restoration of Arizona native plants and their habitats. They work with the Southwest Rare Plant Task Force to develop strategies for protecting rare species and their habitats; they keep abreast of conservation issues concerning native plants species and responds to those through their Conservation Committee; they promote the use of native species in residential and commercial landscapes; they publish the Plant Press, support the publication of scholarly works and maintains a website with information and links about native plant, and they host a series of statewide events that provide forums to learn from professionals. Member activities and benefits include chapter and statewide gatherings; field trips and educational presentations; conservation through education, outreach and restoration; habitat restoration projects; informative website, newsletters and journals, and interactions with plant experts and enthusiasts.

 

Contact: Arizona Native Plant Society, PO Box 41206, Tucson, Arizona 85717.

 

 

The DESERT SURVIVORS NATIVE PLANT NURSERY

http://www.desertsurvivors.org/nursery.asp

 

The DESERT SURVIVORS NATIVE PLANT NURSERY sells many local native plants and is willing to consider growing any native plant for which there is a buyer.

 

Contact: Desert Survivors Native Plant Nursery, 1020 West Starr Pass Boulevard, Tucson, Arizona 85713, 520-791-9309.

 

 

The TUCSON CACTUS AND SUCCULENT SOCIETY

http://www.tucsoncactus.org/

 

The TUCSON CACTUS AND SUCCULENT SOCIETY is a non-profit organization dedicated to educating, teaching and learning about cacti and succulent plants. Their monthly programs feature knowledgeable individuals who can educate you and help you understand more about these fascinating plants. They conduct and sponsor native cactus and succulent rescue operations, plant sales, field trips, nursery and garden visits, conventions and conferences as well as other activities throughout the year. 

 

NATIVE PLANT RESCUE NOTICE

(The Tucson Cactus and Succulent Society puts a tremendous amount of time and effort  into the

organizing and overseeing of their rescue events. The native plant rescues carried out by the dedicated

members of the Society provide an immeasurable service to our community.)

 

The TUCSON CACTUS AND SUCCULENT SOCIETY organizes native plant rescues in areas being cleared for development. If interested in rescuing plants and/or obtaining local native plants for your landscaping or restoration project join the Society and become a rescue crew member.

 

Contact: Tucson Cactus and Succulent Society, PO Box 64759, Tucson, Arizona 85728-4759, 520-885-6367.

 

 

 

PLANT LISTING

 

 

Agavaceae: The Century-plant Family

 

Agave schottii G. Engelmann var. schottii: Agave, Amole, Amolillo, Schott Agave, Schott’s Century Plant, Shin Dagger, Shin Digger (terrestrial perennial evergreen succulent herb, subshrub or shrub (under 2 feet high with a flowering stem reaching to 12 feet in height); within range reported from canyons, rocky and gravelly slopes, rock outcrops and bajadas 4,000 to 7,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Dasylirion wheeleri S. Watson: Cactus Spoon, Common Sotol, Desert Spoon, Sotol, Spoon Flower, Spoon Plant, Wheeler Dasylirion, Wheeler Sotol (terrestrial perennial evergreen subshrub or shrub (under 8 feet high with a flowering spike reaching to 15 feet in height); within range reported from mesas, canyons, rocky slopes, ridges, bajadas and rocky and gravelly hillsides 4,000 to 6,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; browsed by bighorn sheep)

 

Nolina microcarpa S. Watson: Bear Grass, Palmilla, Sacahuista, Small-seed Nolina, Sotol Chiquito (terrestrial perennial evergreen subshrub or shrub (under 7 feet high with a flowering spike reaching to 8 feet in height); within range reported from mesas, canyons, rock outcrops, hills, sandy and gravelly slopes, bajadas, plains, flats and valleys 3,000 to 6,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Amaranthaceae: The Amaranth Family

 

Guilleminea densa (F.W. von Humbolt & A.J. Bonpland ex C.L. von Wildenow) C.H. Moquin-Tandon var. densa (Brayulinea densa (F.W. von Humbolt & A.J. Bonpland ex C.L. von Wildenow) J.K. Small): Small Matweed (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons, forests, woodlands, scrubs, hillsides, bajadas, among boulders, grasslands, desertscrubs, roadsides, sandy floodplains, riparian areas and disturbed areas 2,500 to 6,200 feet elevation)

 

Anacardiaceae: The Sumac Family

 

Rhus sp.: Sumac (Rhus aromatica W. Aiton)

 

Asteraceae: The Aster Family

(Compositae: The Sunflower Family)

 

Acourtia nana (A. Gray) J.L. Reveal & G. King (Perezia nana A. Gray): Desert Holly, Dwarf Desertpeony (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mesas, bajadas, slopes and gravelly flats below 6,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Ambrosia confertiflora A.P. de Condolle (Franseria confertiflora (A.P. de Condolle) P.A. Rydberg): Altamisa de Playa, Bursage Ragweed, Estafiate, Field Ragweed, Slimleaf Bursage, Weakleaf Burr Ragweed, Weak-leaved Burweed (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mesas, slopes, roadsides, washes, floodplains and disturbed areas 1,000 to 6,500 feet elevation)

 

Baccharis sarothroides A. Gray: Amargo, Broom Baccharis, Desert Broom, Desertbroom, Escoba, Hierba del Pasmo, Mexican Broom, Romerillo, Rosin Brush (terrestrial perennial shrub (to 10 feet high); within range reported from hills, flats, roadsides, along washes and streambeds, floodplains, bottom lands and disturbed areas 1,000 to 5,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental, consider planting male plants only to eliminate seed production)

 

Bahia absinthifolia G. Bentham: Hairyseed Bahia (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mesas, rocky and gravelly slopes, bajadas and gravelly flats 2,500 to 5,500 feet elevation)

 

Cirsium arizonicum (A. Gray) F. Petrak: Arizona Thistle (terrestrial biennial or perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons and canyon bottoms, forests, clearings in forests,  rocky slopes, rocky ledges, meadows, hollows, woodlands, scrubs, foothills, hillsides,  gulches and roadsides 3,000 to 7,700 feet elevation)

 

Ericameria laricifolia (A. Gray) L.H. Shinners (Haplopappus (Aplopappus) laricifolius A. Gray): Larch-leaf Goldenweed, Turpentine Bush, Turpentine Brush (terrestrial perennial subshrub or shrub (to 3 feet high); within range reported from canyons, mesas, rocky slopes and flats 3,000 to 6,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Gutierrezia sp.: Snakeweed

 

Helianthus sp.: Sunflower

 

Hymenothrix wislizeni A. Gray: Golden Ragweed, TransPecos Thimblehead, Wislizenus Beeflower (terrestrial annual or perennial herb; within range reported from mesas, slopes, gravelly flats, roadsides, washes and disturbed areas 2,500 to 5,500 feet elevation)

 

Isocoma tenuisecta E.L. Greene (Aplopappus tenuisectus (E.L. Greene) J. Blake, Haplopappus tenuisectus (E.L. Greene) J. Blake): Burroweed, Hierba del Burrow (terrestrial perennial herb, subshrub or shrub (to 3 feet high); within range reported from mesas, rocky slopes, bajadas, plains, gravelly flats, roadsides, draws and disturbed areas 2,000 to 5,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Machaeranthera gracilis (T. Nuttall) L.H. Shinners (Haplopappus gracilis (T. Nuttall) A. Gray): Goldenweed, Slender Goldenweed, Yellow Daisy, Yellow Spiny Daisy (terrestrial long lived annual herb; within range reported from mesas, rocky slopes, plains and washes below 7,000 feet elevation)

 

Zinnia acerosa (A.P. de Condolle) A. Gray (Zinnia pumila A. Gray): Desert Zinnia, Spinyleaf Zinnia, White Zinnia, Wild Zinnia (terrestrial perennial subshrub or shrub (under 1 foot high); within range reported from mesas, rocky slopes, gravelly bajadas, gravelly flats and floodplains 2,500 to 5,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Bignoniaceae: The Trumpet-creeper Family

 

Chilopsis linearis (A.J. Cavanilles) R. Sweet subsp. arcuata (F.R. Fosberg) Henrickson (Chilopsis linearis (A.J. Cavanilles) R. Sweet var. arcuata F.R. Fosberg): Desert Catalpa, Desert Willow, Flowering Willow, Jano, Mimbre, Western Desert-willow (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub or tree (to 25 feet high or more); within range reported from roadsides and along washes and streams below 6,000 feet elevation; useful in erosion control and as an ornamental)

 

Cactaceae: The Cactus Family

 

Carnegiea gigantea (G. Engelmann) N.L. Britton & J.N. Rose (Cereus giganteus G. Engelmann): Giant Cactus, Saguaro, Sahuaro (terrestrial perennial succulent tree (to 50  feet high or more); within range reported from canyon walls, rocky and gravelly slopes, ridges and foothills, rocky hill sides, bajadas, plains, gravelly flats, valleys and along washes and arroyos below 5,100 feet elevation; white-wing doves as well as other birds and animals feed on the saguaro seeds during fruiting season; Gila Woodpeckers and Gilded Flickers make holes in this plant for their nests which are later utilized by Elf Owls; useful as an ornamental. PERIPHERAL PLANT(S))

 

Echinocereus rigidissimus (G. Engelmann) F.A. Haage f. (Echinocereus pectinatus (M.J. Scheidweiler) G. Engelmann var. rigidissimus (G. Engelmann) K.T. Rumpler): Arizona Rainbow Cactus, Rainbow Echinocereus, Rainbow Hedgehog, Rainbow Hedgehog Cactus (terrestrial perennial succulent subshrub or shrub (to 1 foot); within range reported from mountains, hills, grasslands and flats 4,000 to 6,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Escobaria vivipara (T. Nuttall) F. Buxbaum var. bisbeeana (C.R. Orcutt) D.R. Hunt (Coryphantha vivipara (T. Nuttall) N.L. Britton & J.N. Rose var. bisbeeana (C.R. Orcutt) L. Benson): Beehive Cactus, Bisbee Beehive Cactus, Bisbee Spinystar, Cushion Cactus, Spinystar, Spiny Star Cactus (terrestrial perennial succulent subshrub or shrub (to 1 foot high); within range reported from mountains, hills, slopes, plains and flats 3,000 to 7,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Ferocactus wislizeni (G. Engelmann) N.L. Britton & J.N. Rose: Arizona Barrel Cactus, Barrel Cactus, Bisnaga, Biznaga, Biznaga de Agua, Biznagre, Candy Barrelcactus, Compass Barrel, Compass Plant, Fishhook Barrel Cactus, Southwest Barrel Cactus, Southwestern Barrel Cactus, Visnaga, Wislizenus Barrel, Yellow-spined Barrel Cactus (terrestrial perennial succulent subshrub, shrub or tree (to 11 feet high); within range reported from canyon walls, rocky slopes, hills, bajadas, plains, gravelly flats and along washes and arroyos below 4,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Mammillaria grahamii G. Engelmann var. grahamii (Mammillaria microcarpa G. Engelmann): Arizona Fishhook Cabeza de Viejo Cekida, Cactus, Biznaguita, Fishhook Cactus, Graham Fishhook, Graham’s Nipple Cactus, Graham Pincushion Cactus, Lizard Catcher (terrestrial perennial succulent subshrub or shrub (under 6 inches high); within range reported from rocky slopes, rock outcrops, rocky hillsides, boulder crevices, gravelly flats, valleys and along washes below 4,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Opuntia engelmannii J.F. Salm-Reifferscheid-Dyck var. engelmannii (Opuntia phaeacantha G. Engelmann var. discata (D. Griffiths) L. Benson & D.L. Walkington): Abrojo, Cactus Apple, Desert Pricklypear Cactus, Engelmann Pricklypear, Flaming Pricklypear, Joconostle, Nopal, Prickly Pear, Vela de Coyote (terrestrial perennial succulent subshrub or shrub (to 4 feet high); within range reported from canyon bottoms, rocky slopes, ridges, bajadas, slopes, benches, rocky and gravelly flats, valleys, and along washes, gullies and arroyos 1,000 to 6,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; provides cover for many desert animals)

 

Opuntia fulgida G. Engelmann var. fulgida: Chain Cholla, Chain-fruit Cholla, Cholla, Cholla Brincadora, Choya, Jumping Cholla, Sonora Jumping Cholla, Velas de Ccoyote (terrestrial perennial succulent subshrub, shrub or tree (to 15 feet high); within range reported from mesas, rocky slopes, hills, bajadas, plains, gravelly flats, valleys and along washes below 4,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Opuntia fulgida G. Engelmann var. mammillata (H.W. Schott ex G. Engelmann) T. Coulter: Cholla Brincadora, Cholla, Jumping Cholla, Smooth Chain-fruit Cholla, Velas de Coyote (terrestrial perennial succulent subshrub, shrub or tree (to 15 feet high); within range reported from hills, bajadas, gravelly flats and along washes below 4,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Opuntia santa-rita (D. Griffiths & R.F. Hare) J.N. Rose (Opuntia violacea G. Engelmann ex B.D. Jackson var. santa-rita (D. Griffiths & R.F. Hare) L. Benson: Blue Blade, Dollar Cactus, Duraznilla, Nopal Morado, Purple Pricklypear, Red Blade Pricklypear, Santa Rita Cactus, Santa Rita Pricklypear (terrestrial perennial succulent subshrub, shrub or tree (to 5 feet high); within range reported from canyons, ridges, bajadas, slopes, flats and valleys 2,000 to 4,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Opuntia spinosior (G. Engelmann) J.W. Toumey: Cane Cholla, Cardenche, Handgrip Cholla, Spiny Cholla, Tasajo, Walkingstick Cactus, Walking Stick Cholla (terrestrial perennial succulent subshrub, shrub or tree (to 10 feet high); within range reported from mountainsides, canyons, hills, bajadas, gravelly flats, valleys, along washes and arroyos and floodplains 1,000 to 5,000+ feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Chenopodiaceae: The Goosefoot Family

 

Atriplex canescens (F.T. Pursh) T. Nuttall: Cenizo, Chamiso, Chamiso Cenizo, Chamiza, Costilla de Vaca, Four-wing Saltbush, Narrow-leaf Saltbush, Narrowleaf Wingscale, Thinleaf Fourwing Saltbush, Grey Sage Brush, Orache, Saladillo, Wngscale (terrestrial perennial evergreen shrub (3 to 6 feet high); within range reported from rocky slopes, gravelly and sandy flats and along washes below 6,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental and in controlling erosion)

 

Convolvulaceae: The Morning-glory Family

 

Evolvulus arizonicus A. Gray: Arizona Blue-eyes, Evolvulus, Wild Dwarf Morning-glory, Wild Morning-glory (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from canyons, rocky and gravelly slopes, flats and along washes 3,500 to 5,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Ipomoea hederacea (C. Linnaeus) N.J. von Jacquin (Ipomoea hirsutula auct. non N.J. von Jacquin f.): Blue Morning-glory, Desert Morning-glory, Ivyleaf Morning-glory, Morning Glory, Trompillo Morado (terrestrial annual herb or vine; within range reported from canyons, rocky slopes, along washes and floodplains 1,000 to 5,500 feet elevation. EXOTIC Invasive Plant)

 

Cupressaceae: The Cypress Family

 

Juniperus deppeana E.G. von Steudel: Alligator Bark Juniper, Alligator Juniper, Checker Bark Juniper, Western Juniper (terrestrial perennial evergreen shrub or tree (20 to 65 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons, forests, rocky slopes, rocky hillsides, woodlands, grasslands, along washes and rocky soils 4,200 to 8,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental with older trees having considerable character; birds and mammals feed on the berries)

 

Ericaceae: The Heath Family

 

Arctostaphylos pungens K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland & Kunth: Bearberry, Manzanilla, Mexican Manzanita, Pinguica, Pointleaf Manzanita (terrestrial perennial evergreen subshrub or shrub (to 6 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyon bottoms, bases of cliffs, gravelly slopes, forests, woodlands, scrubs, plains, grasslands, along washes and floodplains 3,400 to 8,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; fruits are eaten by bears, birds and other animals)

 

Euphorbiaceae: The Spurge Family

 

Croton pottsii (J.F. Klotzsch) J. Müller Argoviensis var. pottsii (Croton corymbulosus G. Engelmann): Leatherweed, Leather Weed Croton (terrestrial perennial herb, subshrub or shrub; within range reported from rocky slopes 2,500 to 6,000 feet elevation)

 

Jatropha macrorhiza G. Bentham (var. septemfida G. Engelmann is the variety reported as occurring in Arizona): Ragged Nettlespurge (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mesas and plains 3,500 to 7,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Fabaceae (Leguminosae): The Pea Family

 

Acacia greggii A. Gray var. greggii (Acacia greggii A. Gray, Acacia greggii A. Gray var. arizonica P.T. Isley): Algarroba, Catclaw, Catclaw Acacia, Devil’s Claw, Gatuno, Gregg Catclaw, Tear Blanket, Tepame, Tesota, Una de Gato (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub or tree (to 23 feet high); within range reported from canyons, rocky slopes, among boulders, floodplains and along sandy washes and streams below 4,500 feet elevation: useful as an ornamental)

 

Calliandra eriophylla G. Bentham var. eriophylla: Cabelleto de Angel, Cabeza Angel, Fairyduster, False Mesquite, False Mesquite Calliandra, Guajillo, Hairy-leaved Calliandra, Huajillo, Mesquitilla (terrestrial perennial deciduous subshrub or shrub (to 3 feet high); within range reported from mesas, canyons, rocky slopes, gravelly bajadas, gravelly flats and along washes below 5,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; browsed by wildlife.)

 

Eysenhardtia orthocarpa (A. Gray) S. Watson (Eysenhardtia polystachya (C.G. de Ortega) C.S. Sargent: Mexican Kidneywood of west-central Mexico is no longer considered to be a species occurring in Arizona): Tahitian Kidneywood (terrestrial perennial shrub or tree (10 to 20 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons, rocky slopes, talus slopes, woodlands, rocky hills, grasslands, plains, along arroyos, washes, streambeds, riparian areas and gravelly soils 3,000 to 6,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Mimosa aculeaticarpa C.G. de Ortega var. biuncifera (G. Bentham) R.C. Barneby (Mimosa biuncifera G. Bentham): Cat Claw, Catclaw Mimosa, Garruno, Gatuno, Una de Gato, Wait-a-bit, Wait-a-minute, Wait-a-Minute Bush (terrestrial perennial shrub or small tree (to 8 feet high); within range reported from mesas, canyons, rocky slopes, hillsides, gravelly flats and along washes 3,000 to 6,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; provides cover for wildlife and forage for Whitetail Deer; reportedly useful in controlling erosion)

 

Mimosa dysocarpa G. Bentham (Mimosa dysocarpa G. Bentham var. wrightii (A. Gray) T.H. Kearney & R.H. Peebles): Velvetpod Mimosa (terrestrial perennial shrub (to 7 feet high); within range reported from hillsides, gentle slopes and along arroyos and washes 3,500 to 6,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental with very attractive spikes of purplish-pink flowers)

 

Prosopis velutina E.O. Wooton (Prosopis juliflora (O. Swartz) A.P. de Condolle var. velutina (E.O. Wooton) C.S. Sargent): Algarroba, Chachaca, Mesquite, Mezquite, Velvet Mesquite (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub or tree (20 to 50 feet high); within range reported from mesas, canyons, bajadas, slopes, gravelly flats, roadsides, along washes and streams and floodplains below 6,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; provides food and shelter for many species of wildlife)

 

Fagaceae: The Beech Family

 

Quercus emoryi J. Torrey: Blackjack Oak, Black Oak, Bellota, Emory Oak (terrestrial perennial evergreen shrub or tree (to 50 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons and canyon bottoms, ridges, slopes, woodlands and foothills 3,000 to 8,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; the acorns “bellotas” are eaten by wildlife and the leaves are browsed by deer)

 

Quercus grisea F.M. Liebmann: Gray Oak, Scrub Oak, Shin Oak: (terrestrial perennial deciduous or evergreen shrub or tree (to 65 feet elevation); within range reported from mountains, canyons, rocky slopes, woodlands, foothills 5,000 to 7,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Quercus rugosa L. Née, (Quercus reticulata F.W. von Humbolt & A.J. Bonpland): Netleaf Oak (terrestrial perennial evergreen shrub or tree (6 to 40 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons, gravelly slopes, gulches, ravines and woodlands 4,000 to 8,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; wildlife feed on the acorns)

 

Fouquieriaceae: The Ocotillo Family

 

Fouquieria splendens G. Engelmann: Albarda, Barda, Candle Bush, Candle Wood, Coach Whip, Flamingsword, Jacob’s Staff, Monkey-tail, Ocotillo, Ocotillo del Corral, Slimwood, Vine Cactus (terrestrial perennial shrub (7 to 33 feet high); within range reported from mesas, rocky slopes, hills, bajadas, plains and gravelly flats below 6,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; a preferred food plant of Costa’s Hummingbird)

 

Garryaceae: The Silktassel Family

 

Garrya wrightii J. Torrey: Coffeeberry-bush, Feverbush, Grayleaf Dogwood, Quinine-bush, Wright’s Silktassel (terrestrial perennial shrub (to15 feet high); within range reported from canyons, rocky slopes, woodlands, scrubs and grasslands 3,000 to 8,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; plants are browsed by deer and Bighorn Sheep)

 

Krameriaceae: The Ratany Family

 

Krameria erecta C.L. von Wildenow (Krameria parviflora G. Bentham): Chacate, Coashui, Littleleaf Ratany, Pima Ratany, Purple Heather, Range Ratany, Small-flower Ratany (terrestrial perennial subshrub or shrub (under 2 feet high); within range reported from mesas, rocky and gravelly slopes, gravelly bajadas, plains and gravelly flats below 5,000 feet)

 

Malpighiaceae: The Barbados-cherry Family

 

Janusia gracilis A. Gray: Desert Vine, Fermina, Slender Janusia (terrestrial perennial vine or woody climber; within range reported from rocky slopes, gravelly bajadas and gravelly flats; useful as an ornamental 1,000 to 5,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Malvaceae: The Mallow Family

 

Gossypium thurberi A. Todaro: Algodoncillo, Desert Cotton, Thurber’s Cotton, Thurberia, Wild Cotton, Wild Desert Cotton (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub or tree (3 to 12 feet high); within range reported from canyons, gravelly and rocky slopes and along washes, streambeds and ditches 2,500 to 7,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Sphaeralcea sp.: Globemallow

 

Papaveraceae: The Poppy Family

 

Argemone pleiacantha E.L. Greene: Bluestem Pricklepoppy, Chicolote, Cowboys’ Fried Eggs, Southwestern Pricklypoppy, Thistle Poppy (terrestrial biennial herb; within range reported from mountains, mesas, canyons, forests, hills, slopes, meadows, grasslands, gravelly flats, desertscrubs, roadsides, arroyos, gravelly washes, riparian areas, gravelly and  sandy soils and disturbed areas1,700 to 9,300 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Pineaceae: The Pine Family

 

Pinus discolor D.K. Bailey & F.G. Hawksworth: Border Pinyon, Nut Pine, Pinyon Pine (terrestrial perennial evergreen tree (15 to 50 feet high); within range reported from mountains, mesas, plateaus, rocky slopes, among boulders and along streambeds 5,000 to 7,500 feet elevation; the seeds are eaten by wildlife; useful as an ornamental)

 

Poaceae (Gramineae): The Grass Family

 

Aristida ternipes A.J. Cavanilles: Spidergrass (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mesas, plateaus, rocky and gravelly slopes, hills, gravelly and sandy bajadas, gravelly flats, roadsides and disturbed areas below 6,000 feet elevation)

 

Bothriochloa barbinodis (M. Lagasca y Segura) W.G. Herter (Andropogon barbinodis M. Lagasca y Segura): Algodonero, Bristlejoint Bluestem, Cane Beard Grass, Cane Bluestem, Perforated Bluestem, Pinhole Beardgrass, Pinhole Bluestem, Popotillo, Zacate Popotillo (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from rocky slopes, gravelly flats and along washes 1,000 to 6,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Bouteloua chondrosioides (K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth) G. Bentham ex S. Watson: Harvard Grama, Sprucetop Grama, Woolly-spiked Grama (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from rocky slopes and rocky flats 2,000 to 5,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Bouteloua curtipendula (A. Michaux) J. Torrey: Navajita Banderilla, Sideoats Grama (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mesas, rocky and gravelly slopes and hills below 7,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Bouteloua rothrockii G. Vasey (Bouteloua barbata M. Lagasca y Segura var. rothrockii (G. Vasey) F.W. Gould): Navajita Liebrero, Rothrock’s Grama (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mesas, rocky slopes, hills, sandy bajadas, gravelly flats, roadsides and along washes below 5,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Dasyochloa pulchella (K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth) C.L. von Wildenow x P.A. Rydberg (Erioneuron pulchellum (K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth) T. Tateoka, Tridens pulchellus (K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth) A.S. Hitchcock): Desert Fluffgrass, Fluffgrass, Low Woollygrass, Zacate Borreguero (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mesas, rocky slopes, rocky hills, gravelly bajadas and gravelly flats below 5,500 feet elevation)

 

Digitaria californica (G. Bentham) J.S. Henrickson (Trichachne californica (G. Bentham) M.A. Chase): Arizona Cottontop, California Cottontop, Cotton-top, Zacate Punta Blanca (terrestrial perennial herb or subshrub; within range reported from mesas, canyons, rocky slopes and gravelly flats 1,000 to 6,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Elionurus barbiculmis E. Hackel (Eyionurus barbiculmis E. Hackel in Arizona Flora): Woolspike Balsamscale, Wooly Bunchgrass, Woolyspike Balsamscale (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons and canyon bottoms, rocky slopes, slopes, woodlands, grasslands, plains, gulches and sandy washes 3,400 to 6,000 feet elevation)

 

Eragrostis lehmanniana C.G. Nees von Esenbeck: Lehmann Lovegrass, Zacate Africano, Zacate de Amor (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from gravelly slopes, gravelly bajadas, gravelly flats, roadsides, along sandy washes and disturbed areas. EXOTIC Invasive Plant; poses a significant threat to native habitat)

 

Poa fendleriana (E.G. von Steudel) G. Vasey: Fendler Bluegrass, Muttongrass (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from rocky and gravelly slopes, forests, woodlands and streambeds 3,500 to 10,500 feet elevation; valuable as a forage plant for wildlife)

 

Setaria vulpiseta (J.B. de Lamarck) J.J. Roemer & J.A. Shultes (Setaria macrostachya K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth): Assaak, Plains Bristlegrass, Xikkaa Kiix, Zacate Tempranero, Zacate Temprano (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from canyons, rocky slopes, plains, gravelly flats, along washes and streambeds 2,000 to 7,000 feet elevation)

 

Polygonaceae: The Buckwheat Family

 

Polygonum aviculare C. Linnaeus: Prostrate Knotweed (terrestrial long lived annual or perennial herb; within range reported from gravelly flats, roadsides, shorelines and disturbed areas 1,000 to 8,000 feet elevation. EXOTIC Invasive Plant)

 

Rhamnaceae: The Buckthorn Family

 

Ziziphus obtusifolia (W.J. Hooker ex J. Torrey & A. Gray) A. Gray var. canescens (A. Gray) M.C. Johnston (Condalia lycioides (A. Gray) A. Weberbauer var. canescens (A. Gray) W. Trelease): Abrojo, Bachata, Barbachatas, Clepe, Garrapata, Garumbullo, Gray-leaved Abrojo, Gray-thorn, Greythorn, Gumdrop Tree, Lotebush, Palo Blanco, Southwestern Condalia, White Crucillo (terrestrial perennial shrub or small tree (to 10 feet high); within range reported from mesas, gravelly slopes, gravelly bajadas, plains, gravelly flats, along washes and streambeds and bottomlands 1,000 to 5,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Rubiaceae: The Madder Family

 

Bouvardia ternifolia (A.J. Cavanilles) D.F. von Schlechtendal (Bouvardia glaberrima G. Engelmann): Firecrackerbush, Scarlet Bouvardia, Smooth Bouvardia, Trompetilla (terrestrial perennial shrub (to 3 feet high); within range reported from canyons, rocky slopes and among boulders, preferring partial shade 3,000 to 9,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; attracts and provides nectar for hummingbirds)

 

Sapindaceae: The Soapberry Family

 

Dodonaea viscosa (N.J. von Jacquin) C. Linnaeus (Dodonaea viscosa N.J. von Jacquin var. angustifolia (C. Linnaeus f.) G. Bentham): Airia, Akeake, Chapuliztle, Cuerno de Cabra, Florida Hopbush, Granadina, Guayabillo, Hierba de la Cucaracha, Hop Bush, Jarilla, Munditos, Pirimu, Switch-sorrel, Tarachico, Varal (terrestrial perennial shrub or tree (to 12 feet high); within range reported from canyons, rocky slopes and along washes 2,000 to 5,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; plant may have poisonous qualities)

 

Solanaceae: The Potato Family

 

Datura wrightii E.A. Regel (Datura metaloides auct. non M.F. Dunal): Giant Jimson, Indian Apple, Jimson Weed, Moon Lily, Sacred Datura, Sacred Thorn-apple, Thornapple, Tolache, Tolguacha, Western Jimson (terrestrial annual or perennial herb or subshrub; within range reported from mesas, plains, roadsides, arroyos, along ditches and disturbed areas 1,000 to 6,500 feet elevation. Poisonous)

 

Solanum elaeagnifolium A.J. Cavanilles: Bull Nettle, Desert Nightshade, Silver Horsenettle, Silverleaf Nightshade, Trompillo, White Horsenettle (terrestrial perennial herb or subshrub; within range reported from plains, flats, roadsides, cienegas and disturbed areas 1,000 to 5,500 feet elevation)

 

Solanum rostratum M.F. Dunal: Buffalo Burr, Buffalobur Nightshade, Colorado Bur, Mala Muier, Mexican Thistle, Texas Thistle (terrestrial annual herb; within range reported from plains, roadsides and disturbed areas 1,000 to 7,000 feet elevation; leaves and seed pods have been reported to be poisonous, possibly introduced fro further east)

 

Ulmaceae: The Elm Family

 

Celtis laevigata C.L. von Wildenow var. reticulata (J. Torrey) L. Benson (Celtis reticulata (J. Torrey) L. Benson): Canyon Hackberry, False Elm, Netleaf Hackberry, Palo Blanco, Sugarberry, Western Hackberry (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub or tree (to 30 feet high); within range reported from moist soils of canyons, hillsides, flats, fencerows and along washes and streams 1,500 to 3,500 feet elevation; the fruit is eaten by wildlife; useful as an ornamental)

 

Celtis pallida J. Torrey: Acebuche, Bainoro, Capul, Desert Hackberry, Garabato, Garambullo, Granjeno, Huasteco, Palo de Aguila, Rompecapa, Shiny Hackberry, Spiny Hackberry (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub or tree (3 to 18 feet high); within range reported from canyons, mesas, rocky slopes, bajadas, flats, along washes and streambeds 2,500 to 6,000 feet elevation; this plant provides excellent cover for many birds, and the fruit are eaten by many birds and small desert mammals; useful as an ornamental)

 

Viscaceae: The Christmas Mistletoe Family

(Loranthaceae: The Mistletoe Family)

 

Phoradendron sp. Mistletoe (observed growing on Celtis laevigata var. reticulata , Canyon Hackberry)

 

Phoradendron californicum T. Nuttall (Phoradendron californicum T. Nuttall var. distans W. Trelease): American Mistletoe, Desert Mistletoe, Mesquite Mistletoe, Toji, Western Dwarf Mistletoe (terrestrial perennial subshrub or shrub; partial parasite observed growing on Catclaw Acacia and Velvet Mesquite, commonly found on Acacia spp., Condalia spp., Larrea spp., Olneya spp., Parkinsonia spp., Prosopis spp., and Ziziphus spp. below 4,000 feet elevation; Phainopeplas feed on the berries and disperse the seeds to other host plants; Verdins nest in the stems; the fragrant flowers attract insects)

 

Zygophyllaceae: The Creosote-bush Family

 

Kallstroemia grandiflora J. Torrey ex A Gray: Arizona Caltrop, Arizona Poppy, Arizona Summer Poppy, Baiborin, Desert Poppy, Mexican Poppy, Orange Caltrop, Summer Poppy (terrestrial summer annual herb; within range reported from mesas, canyons, rocky slopes, gravelly bajadas, plains, rocky and gravelly flats, roadsides and washes below 5,000 feet elevation)

 

 

 

ANIMAL LISTING

 

 

MAMMALS

 

Cervidae:  Deer and Allies

 

Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmermann) subsp. couesi: Arizona Whitetail, Coues’ Deer, Coues’ White-tailed Deer, Fantail, Sonora White-tailed Deer, Sonoran Fantail, Venado Cola Blanca (Hispanic), Virginia Deer, Whitetail, White-tailed Deer (feeds on fungi, grass and acorns, branches, buds, cones, fruits, leaves, mast, needles and /or twigs of alder, barberry, buckbrush, calliandra, catclaw acacia, Emory and scrub oaks and other evergreen oaks, hackberry, hemlock, holly-leaf buckthorn, juniper, mesquite, mountainlover, Oregon-grape, pinyon, ratany, sagebrush, skunkbush, spiderwort, spruce, willow, yellow-leaf silktassel; reported from mountains, canyons, forests, woodlands, meadows, scrub and desertscrub)

 

Leporidae: Hares and Rabbits

 

Lepus californicus Gray: Black-tailed Jack Rabbit, “Jackass Rabbit” (feeds on grass, mesquite leaves and prickly-pear cacti)

 

 

 

Listing Footnotes

 

(1) National Geographic Arizona Seamless USGS Topographic Maps. Maps created with TOPO! R C 2002 National Geographic.

               

(2) Walker, Henry P. and Don Bufkin. 1979. Historical Atlas of Arizona, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, Page 4A and Map.

 

(3) Richardson, M.L. and M.L. Miller. March 1974. United States Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service in cooperation with The Pima County Natural Resource Conservation District, Report ands interpretations for the General Soil Map of Pima County, Arizona and General Soil Map Pima County Arizona.

 

(4) Brown, David E., Biotic Communities of the American Southwest – United States and Mexico, Desert Plants, Volume 4, Numbers 1-4, Published by the University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum, 1982, and associated map: Brown, David E. and Charles H. Lowe, Biotic Communities of the Southwest, August 1980, General Technical Report RM-78, United Stated Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Revised June 1983

 

(5) Nomenclature generally follows that presented by The Biota of North America Program of the North Carolina Botanical Garden (BONAP) with A Synonymized Checklist of the Vascular Flora of the United States, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, Full Index 1998.

http://www.bonap.org/

http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/b98/check98.htm

 

(6) Growth habits generally coincide with that given by the National Plants Database. Common names identified in the database have been printed in bold lettering: USDA, NRCS. 2004. The PLANTS Database, Version 3.5 (http://plants.usda.gov). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA

 

 

 

Literature, References and Web Sites Cited, Consulted and Visited for Listings

 

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*McLaughlin, Steven P. July 18, 1990. Flora of Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge (including Arivaca Cienega), Office of Arid Land Studies, University of Arizona.

*Medina, Alvin L. 2003. Historical and Recent Flora of the Santa Rita Experimental Range, USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-30.2003 Pages 141 thru 148.

*Milne, Lorus and Margery. 1980. The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Insects and Spiders, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, New York.

*Minckly, W. L. 1973. Fishes of Arizona, Sims Printing Company, Inc., Phoenix, Arizona.

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