December 21, 2005 Update

 

 

TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, PIMA COUNTY, ARIZONA

Gila and Salt River Baseline and Meridian

 

 

Major Contributors and Sources of Information: Matthew B. Johnson, Program Manager and Curator of the Desert Legume Program - Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum. William T. Kendall. Arizona Game and Fish Department, Heritage Data Management System - Special Status Species Reports. Southwest Environmental Information Network (SEINet).

 

 

Species Distribution Lists are being developed to encourage and promote the conservation of local native animals and plants. They are developed for legally defined geographic areas, and larger bodies of water. They are provided to environmental consultants, property owners, and government agencies interested in promoting conservation. Listings include species reported as having been observed in or reported from the described area.

 

Due to continuing additions and corrections the listings should be considered a work in progress. Species once reported as having occurred within the described area, but that no longer occurs there are shown are having been EXTIRPATED. This list includes species that are not native to Arizona (EXOTIC). Exotic plants are not recommended for use in landscaping or restoration projects. Disjunct species, outliers and plants on the edge of the main population, as observed by the surveyor, are noted as being PERIPHERAL PLANT(S). Landscaped plants are not included in the listings unless they have become naturalized in the surrounding native environment.

 

Local native vegetation is recommended for use in landscaping and restoration projects. To determine what could be considered as local native vegetation look at both the project township and the eight contiguous townships for plants of similar habitat and elevation. Plants should be planted in their approximate original habitat and density. Use of native plants encourages native animals to remain in the area and helps to retain the areas natural beauty, unique identity and heritage.

 

Appreciation is expressed to the officers and staff of the Arizona Department of Agriculture, the Arizona Game and Fish Department, Pima County and local government offices for the protection provided to our native animals and plants.

 

Species Distribution Lists are periodically updated and revised. These listings have been created and maintained by William T. Kendall. Comments, the reporting of corrections, the reporting of unrecorded species in townships and the reporting of information relating to the historical distribution of species would be greatly appreciated, and may be sent by mail to: Kendall Environmental Surveys, P.O. Box 87967, Tucson, Arizona 85754-7967, or E-mail to: KendallEnvironmentalSurveys@msn.com.

 

 

DISCLAIMER: The information presented as township notes has been obtained from large scale mapping and should be used only as a general guide. Information used in these lists is accepted from biologists and individuals interested in helping to promote the conservation of our natural resources. Mistakes are made in the identification of species and in the recording of information, and changes in nomenclature occur. For these reasons I can not and do not warrant the accuracy of these listings.

 

 

CAUTION: Many native desert plants have sharp thorns and spines. Care should be given when handling them and consideration should be given to public safety at sites where they are to be planted.

 

 

 

This photograph was taken looking southwest, Thimble Peak is in the background and the Tucson Mountains are the far distant mountains. WTK August 2005

 

The following are a few of the plants reported from this township that might be useful in landscaping and restoration projects. Trees and Large Shrubs: Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca), White Fir (Abies concolor), Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa var. scopulorum), Arizona Pine (Pinus arizonica), Southwestern White Pine (Pinus strobiformis), Arizona Cypress (Cupressus arizonica), Arizona Sycamore (Platanus wrightii), Arizona White Oak (Quercus arizonica), Limber Pine (Pinus flexilis), Gambel Oak (Quercus gambelii var. gambelii), Arizona Alder (Alnus oblongifolia), Silverleaf Oak (Quercus hypoleucoides), Alligator Juniper (Juniperus deppeana), Box-elder (Acer negundo), Emory Oak (Quercus emoryi), Arizona Madrone (Arbutus arizonica), Bigtooth Maple (Acer grandidentatum), Arizona Walnut (Juglans major), Border Pinyon (Pinus discolor), Netleaf Oak (Quercus rugosa), Scouler Willow (Salix scouleriana), Arroyo Willow (Salix lasiolepis), Mountain Yucca (Yucca schottii), Wright Silktassel (Garrya wrightii), Rock Spirea (Holodiscus dumosus) and Common Sotol (Dasylirion wheeleri). Vines and Climbers: Canyon Grape (Vitis arizonica). Shrubs and Large Grasses: Bear Grass (Nolina microcarpa), Fendler Ceanothus (Ceanothus fendleri), Pringle Manzanita (Arctostaphylos pringlei subsp. pringlei), Pointleaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos pungens), Smooth Pricklypear Cactus (Opuntia phaeacantha var. laevis), Grayleaf Red Raspberry (Rubus idaeus subsp. strigosus), White Sagebrush (Artemisia ludoviciana subsp. ludoviciana), Four-wing Saltbush (Atriplex canescens), Mountain Snowberry (Symphoricarpos oreophilus), Golden-flowered Agave (Agave chrysantha) and Western Bracken (Pteridium aquilinum). Subshrubs, Herbs and Small Succulents: Hairy Brackenfern (Pteridium aquilinum), Subarctic Ladyfern (Athyrium filix-femina), New Mexico Cliff Fern (Woodsia neomexicana), Golden Columbine (Aquilegia chrysantha), Pringle Speargrass (Piptochaetium pringlei), Purple Meadow-rue (Thalictrum dasycarpum), Fendler Meadow-rue (Thalictrum fendleri), Bulb Panicgrass (Panicum bulbosum), Slender Hairgrass (Deschampsia elongata), Lemmon Marigold (Tagetes lemmonii), Fragrant Snakeroot (Ageratina herbacea), Rincon Mountain Indian Paintbrush (Castilleja austromontana), Wholeleaf Indian Paintbrush (Castilleja integra), Schott Agave (Agave schottii), Sycamore Muhly (Muhlenbergia elongata), Scarlet Hedgehog Cactus (Echinocereus coccineus var. coccineus), Richardson Geranium (Geranium richardsonii), Mountain Lobelia (Lobelia anatina), Canadian White Violet (Viola canadensis), Seep Monkeyflower (Mimulus guttatus), Arizona Wheatgrass (Elymus arizonicus), Woolly Lipfern (Cheilanthes tomentosa), Fendler Lipfern (Cheilanthes fendleri), Pink Allumroot (Heuchera rubescens var. versicolor) and Ponderosa Violet (Viola umbraticola).

 

 

Township Notes

 

Location: This township is located in northeastern Pima County in south-central Arizona. A portion of Butterfly Peak Natural Area and Pusch Ridge Wilderness Area are located within this township. This township is located within Coronado National Forest.

 

Landmarks: This township is located in the Santa Catalina Mountains. Named peaks and features include Barnum Rock, Bear Saddle, Goosehead Rock, Green Mountain (7,904 feet), Guthrie Mountain (6,464 feet), Horse Camp Spring, Kellogg Mountain (shown as being 7,890, 8,385 and 8,401 feet), Lizard Rock, Mount Bigelow (8,550 feet), Organization Ridge, Palisade Rock, Pine Canyon Falls, Rose Peak (7,299 feet), San Pedro Vista, Seven Cataracts, Spenser Peak (8,206 feet), Windy Point and Windy Point Vista. Name canyons include Bear Canyon, Edgar Canyon, Molino Canyon, Palisade Canyon, Pine Canyon, Rose Canyon, Sabino Canyon - East Fork, Spencer Canyon, Sycamore Canyon and Willow Canyon. Named springs include Apache Spring, Box Spring, Boy Scout Spring, Bug Spring, Girl Scout Spring, Horse Camp Spring, Maverick Spring, Mud Spring and Palisade Spring. Named lakes include Rose Canyon Lake and Sycamore Reservoir.  

 

Elevation: Elevations range from approximately 4,160 in Bear Canyon on the west township line to approximately 8,550 feet at Mount Bigelow (1).

 

Physiographic Province: This township is located within the Mexican Highland Section of the Basin and Range Physiographic Province (2).

 

Soil: Soils are described as thermic (hot) arid and semiarid soils (soils with mean annual temperatures of 59 degrees to 72 degrees Fahrenheit (15 degrees to 22 degrees Centigrade) and 10 to 16 inches (25 to 41 cm) mean annual precipitation) of the Rock Outcrop-Lampshire-Cellar Association (rock outcrop and very shallow and shallow semiarid soils of the mountains and foothills), mesic (cool) subhumid soils (soils with mean annual soil temperatures of 47 degrees to 59 degrees Fahrenheit (8 degrees to 15 degrees Centigrade) and more than 16 inches (41 cm) mean annual precipitation) of the Rock Outcrop-Barkerville-Faraway Association (rock outcrop and very shallow and shallow subhumid soils of the mountains), and frigid (cold) subhumid soils (soils with mean annual soil temperatures of less than 47 degrees Fahrenheit (8 degrees Centigrade) and more than 16 inches (41 cm) mean annual precipitation) of the Mirabal-Rock Outcrop Association (very shallow to moderately deep soils and rock outcrop of the higher mountains) (3).

 

Biotic Community: Portions of this township are located within the Scrub-Grassland (Semidesert Grassland) Regional Formation of the Grassland Formation, Interior Chaparral of the Scrub Formation, Madrean Evergreen Woodland Regional Formation of the Woodland Formation, and Rocky Mountain (Petran) Montane Conifer Forest Regional Formation of the Forest Formation with associated Wetland Formations (4).

 

 

Maps created with TOPO! R C 2002 National Geographic

 

Map of Township Showing Adjacent Sections

 

 

The ARIZONA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY

http://aznps.org/

 

The ARIZONA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY is a statewide nonprofit organization devoted to Arizona's native plants. Its mission is to promote knowledge, appreciation, conservation, and restoration of Arizona native plants and their habitats. They work with the Southwest Rare Plant Task Force to develop strategies for protecting rare species and their habitats; they keep abreast of conservation issues concerning native plants species and responds to those through their Conservation Committee; they promote the use of native species in residential and commercial landscapes; they publish the Plant Press, support the publication of scholarly works and maintains a website with information and links about native plant, and they host a series of statewide events that provide forums to learn from professionals. Member activities and benefits include chapter and statewide gatherings; field trips and educational presentations; conservation through education, outreach and restoration; habitat restoration projects; informative website, newsletters and journals, and interactions with plant experts and enthusiasts.

 

Contact: Arizona Native Plant Society, PO Box 41206, Tucson, Arizona 85717.

 

 

The DESERT SURVIVORS NATIVE PLANT NURSERY

http://www.desertsurvivors.org/nursery.asp

 

The DESERT SURVIVORS NATIVE PLANT NURSERY sells many local native plants and is willing to consider growing any native plant for which there is a buyer.

 

Contact: Desert Survivors Native Plant Nursery, 1020 West Starr Pass Boulevard, Tucson, Arizona 85713, 520-791-9309.

 

 

The TUCSON CACTUS AND SUCCULENT SOCIETY

http://www.tucsoncactus.org/

 

The TUCSON CACTUS AND SUCCULENT SOCIETY is a non-profit organization dedicated to educating, teaching and learning about cacti and succulent plants. Their monthly programs feature knowledgeable individuals who can educate you and help you understand more about these fascinating plants. They conduct and sponsor native cactus and succulent rescue operations, plant sales, field trips, nursery and garden visits, conventions and conferences as well as other activities throughout the year. 

 

NATIVE PLANT RESCUE NOTICE

(The Tucson Cactus and Succulent Society puts a tremendous amount of time and effort  into the

organizing and overseeing of their rescue events. The native plant rescues carried out by the dedicated

members of the Society provide an immeasurable service to our community.)

 

The TUCSON CACTUS AND SUCCULENT SOCIETY organizes native plant rescues in areas being cleared for development. If interested in rescuing plants and/or obtaining local native plants for your landscaping or restoration project join the Society and become a rescue crew member.

 

Contact: Tucson Cactus and Succulent Society, PO Box 64759, Tucson, Arizona 85728-4759, 520-885-6367.

 

 

 

LISTING OF PLANTS

 

STRICTLY ENFORCED LAWS PROTECT MANY OF ARIZONA’S NATIVE  PLANTS FROM

COLLECTION, MUTILATION AND DESTRUCTION

 

 

Aceraceae: The Maple Family

 

Acer grandidentatum T. Nuttall (5): Bigtooth Maple, Canyon Maple, Western sugar Maple (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub or tree (to 50 feet high) (6); within range reported from high mountains, plateaus, canyons, gulches, along streams 4,500 to 7,000 feet elevation; browsed by deer; leaves turning red or yellow in autumn, useful as an ornamental) 

 

Acer negundo C. Linnaeus: Arce, Ashleaf Maple, Ashleaved Maple, Boxelder, Fresno de Guajuco, Manitoba Maple (terrestrial perennial deciduous tree (30 to 60 feet high); within range reported from high mountains, plateaus, canyons, gulches, valleys, roadsides, waste places and moist and wet soils along streams 3,500 to 8,000 feet elevation; browsed by deer; useful as an ornamental)

 

Agavaceae: The Century-plant Family

 

Agave chrysantha R.H. Peebles: Agave, Apache Trail Agave, Golden-flowered Agave, Goldenflower Century Plant (terrestrial perennial evergreen succulent herb, subshrub or shrub (under 3 feet high with a flowering stem reaching to 23 feet in height); within range reported from canyons, rocky slopes, ridges, bajadas and outcrops 3,000 to 7,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Agave schottii G. Engelmann: Agave, Amole, Amolillo, Schott Agave, Schott’s Century Plant, Shin Dagger, Shin Digger (terrestrial perennial evergreen succulent herb, subshrub or shrub (under 2 feet high with a flowering stem reaching to 12 feet in height); within range reported from canyons, rocky and gravelly slopes, rock outcrops and bajadas 4,000 to 7,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Agave schottii G. Engelmann var. treleasei (J.W. Toumey) T.H. Kearney & R.H. Peebles: Agave, Trelease Agave, Trelease’s Century Plant, Trelease Shin Dagger (terrestrial perennial evergreen succulent herb, subshrub or shrub (under 2 feet high with a flowering stem reaching to 12 feet in height); within range reported from rocky slopes, woodlands, grasslands, outcrops and desertscrubs 3,600 to 6,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Yucca schottii G. Engelmann: Hairy Yucca, Hoary Yucca, Mountain Yucca, Schott’s Yucca, Spanish Bayonet, Spanish Dagger (terrestrial perennial narrow-leaved evergreen herb, shrub or tree (6 to 18 feet high with a flowering stalk reaching to 2 feet or more in height); within range reported from canyons, rocky slopes, woodlands, grasslands, hillsides, bajadas and valleys 4,000 to 7,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Apiaceae: The Carrot Family

(Umbelliferae: The Parsley Family)

 

Pseudocymopterus montanus (A. Gray) T. Coulter & J.N. Rose:  Alpine False Mountain-parsley, Alpine False Springparsley, Mountain Parsley (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, forests, grasslands and gulches 5,500 to 12,000 feet elevation)

 

Anacardiaceae: The Sumac Family

 

Rhus sp.: Sumac (10 foot high shrub reported, large red leaves in autumn)

 

Toxicodendron rydbergii (J.K. Small ex P.A. Rydberg) E.L. Greene (Rhus radicans C. Linnaeus (var. rydbergii (J.K. Small) A. Rehder is the variety reported from Arizona), Toxicodendron radicans C.E. Kuntze): Hiedra, Mala, Poison Ivy, Poison-oak, Western Poison Ivy (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub (to 2 feet high, vine may reach a height of over 30 feet with trunk diameters of up to 12 inches); within range reported from mountains, canyons, slopes, ravines, stream banks, streambeds, bottomlands and disturbed areas 3,000 to 8,000 feet elevation; provides beautiful fall colors with the leaves turning yellow, orange and red; the plant’s oils cause painful swelling and skin eruptions, the milky juice is poisonous when taken internally; an applicable saying: “leaflets of three, let it be”; FIREFIGHTERS should exercise caution when working fires in areas where Poison Ivy is known to occur because the plant may not be recognizable and the smoke from the burning plant may carry with it a toxic substance (urushiol) that  can cause serious rashes inside of the nose, throat and lungs. Reported in Sabino Canyon at 32.322N x 110.809W + 2km and Bear Canyon)

 

Apocynacaeae: The Dogbane Family

 

Apocynum androsaemifolium C. Linnaeus: Bitterroot, Flytrap Dogbane, Honey Bloom, Spreading Dogbane, Wandering Milkweed, Wild Ipecac (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, rocky slopes, openings in pine forests and streambeds 7,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Asteraceae: The Aster Family

(Compositae: The Sunflower Family)

 

Achillea millefolium C. Linnaeus var. occidentalis A.P. de Condolle (Achillea lanulosa T. Nuttall); Bloodwort, Carpenter’s Weed, Common Yarrow, Hierba de las Cortaduras, Milfoil, Plumajillo, Western Yarrow, Yarrow (terrestrial perennial herb (12 to 40 inches high); within range reported from mountains, slopes, hillsides, gulches, roadsides, waste ground and disturbed areas 5,500 to 11,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental, yarrow with lavender, pink and white flowers were observed in Marshall Gulch)

 

Ageratina herbacea (A. Gray) R.M. King & H.E. Robinson (Eupatorium herbaceum (A. Gray) E.L. Greene) Ageratina, Fragrant Snakeroot, Herbaceous Joepieweed: (terrestrial perennial herb, subshrub or shrub (to 2 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons, ridgelines, forests, woodlands, rocky slopes, hillsides, among boulders and rocks, scrubs, riparian areas and around lakes 5,000 to 9,000 feet elevation; white flowers, plant is fragrant in drying; useful as an ornamental)

 

Artemisia ludoviciana T. Nuttall subsp. ludoviciana: Louisiana Cudweed Sagewort, Gray Sagewort, Louisiana Sagewort, Louisiana Wormwood, Mugwort Wormwood, Prairie Sage, Sagewort, White Sage, White Sagebrush (terrestrial perennial herb, subshrub or shrub (2 to 4 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons, rocky slopes, ridges, valleys, gulches, along washes, streambeds and fence rows 2,500 to 8,500 feet elevation)

 

Bidens tenuisecta A. Gray: Slimlobe Beggarticks (terrestrial annual herb; within range reported from mountains and canyons, 6,000 to 8,700 feet elevation)

 

Cirsium calcareum (M.E. Jones) E.O. Wooton & P.C. Standley (Cirsium pulchellum (E.L. Greene) E.O. Wooton & P.C. Standley): Cainville Thistle (terrestrial biennial or perennial herb; within range reported from rocky slopes, forests, along dry creeks and sandy soils 4,500 to 10,500 feet elevation)

 

Cirsium ochrocentrum A. Gray: Santa Fe Thistle, Yellowspine Thistle (terrestrial biennial or perennial herb; within range reported from woodlands, clearings and roadsides 4,500 to 8,000 feet elevation)

 

Cirsium wheeleri (A. Gray) F. Petrak: Plume Thistle, Wheeler’s Thistle (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons, rocky slopes, meadows, flats, roadsides, lakesides and disturbed areas 5,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Erigeron arizonicus A. Gray (Erigeron rusbyi A. Gray): Arizona Fleabane (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, talus slopes, slopes, rocky outcrops, gulches, ravines, foothills, roadsides, meadows, along streams and moist soils  7,000 to 10,500 feet elevation)

 

Erigeron oreophilus J.M. Greenman: Chaparral Fleabane (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from canyon bottoms, cliffs, rocky ridges, slopes, rock crevices,  rock outcrops, among rocks and boulders, sandy benches, along streams and disturbed areas 4,500 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Erigeron vreelandii E.L. Greene (Erigeron platyphyllus E.L. Greene): Broadleaf Daisy, Vreeland’s Erigeron (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyon bottoms, meadows, roadsides and rocky road cuts and recently burned forest areas4,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Heliomeris multiflora T. Nuttall var. multiflora (Viguiera multiflora (T. Nuttall) J. Blake): Golden-eye, Resin-weed, Showy Goldeneye, Many-flowered Viguiera (terrestrial perennial herb, subshrub or shrub (to 4 feet high); within range reported from mountains, forests, slopes, meadows, 4,500 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Heterotheca psammophila R. Wagenknecht (Heterotheca subaxillaris (J.B. de Lamarck) N.L. Britton & H.H. Rusby sensu T.H. Kearney & R.H. Peebles): Camphorweed, Golden Aster, Gordolobo, Telegraph Plant (terrestrial long lived annual herb; within range reported from roadsides, ditches, floodplains and disturbed areas 1,000 to 5,500 feet elevation)

 

Hymenoxys hoopesii (A. Gray) M.W. Bierner (Helenium hoopesii A. Gray): Orange Sneeze-weed, Owl’s-claws (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, meadows and wet soils 7,000 to 11,000 feet elevation)

 

Laennecia schiedeana (C.F. Lessing) G.L. Nesom (Conyza schiedeana (C.F. Lessing) A.J. Cronquist, Erigeron schiedeanus C.F. Lessing): Gordolobo, Pineland Marshtail, Simonillo, Xurhatajasi (terrestrial long lived annual herb; within range reported from flats, washes and disturbed areas (2,400?)  7,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Pseudognaphalium macounii (E.L. Greene) J.T. Kartesz comb. nov. ined. (Gnaphalium macounii E.L. Greene): Macoun’s Cudweed (terrestrial annual or biennial herb; within range reported from mountains, meadows, hillsides and drainages 5,400 to 10,000 feet elevation)

 

Senecio bigelovii A. Gray: Bigelow Groundsel, Nodding Groundsel, Nodding Ragwort (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, hillsides, clearings in forests, meadows, roadsides seeps, springs and mist and damp soils 7,000 to 11,000 feet elevation)

 

Senecio eremophilus A.J. Richards var. macdougalii (F.X. Heller) A.J. Cronquist (Senecio macdougalii F.X. Heller): Desert Ragwort, Groundsel, MacDougal’s Ragwort (terrestrial perennial herb, subshrub or shrub (to 3 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons and forests 6,500 to 10,500 feet elevation)

 

Senecio parryi A. Gray: Mountain Ragwort, Parry Groundsel (terrestrial perennial herb or subshrub; within range reported from mountains, woodlands and hillsides 4,600 to 10,900 feet elevation)

 

Solidago canadensis C. Linnaeus var. scabra J. Torrey & A. Gray (Solidago altissima C. Linnaeus): Canada Goldenrod, Field Goldenrod, Late Goldenrod, Meadow Goldenrod, Tall Goldenrod, Three-ribbed Goldenrod, Yellow-weed (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from meadows, flats and roadsides 3,000 to 8,500 feet elevation)

 

Solidago velutina A.P. de Condolle (Solidago sparsiflora A. Gray): Sparse Goldenrod, Threenerve Goldenrod, Velvety Foothills Goldenrod (terrestrial perennial herb, subshrub or shrub; within range reported from mountains, mesas, canyons and canyon bottoms, rocky slopes, hills, meadows, roadsides, springs and streambeds  2,000 to 8,500 feet elevation)

 

Solidago wrightii A. Gray: Wright’s Goldenrod (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains and forests 3,500 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Stevia plummerae A. Gray: Plummer’s Candyleaf (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains and canyons 6,000 to 8,000 feet elevation; the flowers are reported to be fragrant)

 

Stevia serrata A.J. Cavanilles: Sawtooth Candyleaf, Sawtooth Stevia (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, slopes and forests 4,500 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Tagetes lemmonii A. Gray: Lemmon’s Marigold (terrestrial perennial subshrub or shrub; within range reported from mountains, canyons, rocky slopes, forests, streambeds, riparian forests and moist soils 4,000 to 8,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Betulaceae: The Birch Family

 

Alnus oblongifolia J. Torrey: Arizona Alder, Mexican Alder, New Mexican Alder (terrestrial perennial deciduous tree (60 to 80 feet high); within range reported from wet soils in rocky canyon bottoms and along streams in mountains 5,000 to 7,500 feet elevation; useful in checking erosion along watercourses)

 

Brassicaceae (Cruciferae): The Mustard Family

 

Schoenocrambe linearifolia (A. Gray) R.C. Rollins (Sisymbrium linearifolium (A. Gray) E.B. Payson): Slimleaf Plainsmustard (terrestrial perennial herb or subshrub; within range reported from rocky slopes, forests, woodlands, scubs, grasslands, streambeds 2,500 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Cactaceae: The Cactus Family

 

Echinocereus coccineus G. Engelmann (var. coccineus is the variety reported from the Rincon Mountains, Echinocereus triglochidiatus G. Engelmann var. melanacanthus (G. Engelmann) L.D. Benson): Black-spine Claret Cup Hedgehog, Scarlet Hedgehog Cactus (terrestrial perennial succulent subshrub or shrub; within range reported from mountains, ledges, among rocks and boulders and hillsides 3,500 to 9,600 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Mammillaria viridiflora (N.L. Britton & J.N. Rose) F. Böedeker (Mammillaria orestera L. Benson): Fishhook Pincushion, Green Fishhook, Greenflower Nipple Cactus, Green-flowered Pincushion Cactus, Varied Fishhook Cactus (terrestrial perennial succulent subshrub or shrub (under 6 inches high); within range reported from sandy soils on mountainsides and rocky slopes and hillsides; useful as an ornamental)

 

Opuntia engelmannii J.F. Salm-Reifferscheid-Dyck var. engelmannii (Opuntia phaeacantha G. Engelmann var. discata (D. Griffiths) L. Benson & D.L. Walkington): Abrojo, Cactus Apple, Desert Pricklypear Cactus, Engelmann Pricklypear, Flaming Pricklypear, Joconostle, Nopal, Prickly Pear, Vela de Coyote (terrestrial perennial succulent subshrub or shrub (to 4 feet high); within range reported from canyon bottoms, rocky slopes, ridges, bajadas, slopes, benches, rocky and gravelly flats, valleys, and along washes, gullies and arroyos 1,000 to 6,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; provides cover for many desert animals)

 

Opuntia phaeacantha G. Engelmann var. laevis (T. Coulter) L. Benson (Opuntia laevis T. Coulter): Smooth Pricklypear, Tulip Pricklypear (terrestrial perennial succulent subshrub or shrub (to 5 feet high); within range reported from canyons, cliff ledges, slopes and valleys 2,500 to 4,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Campanulaceae: The Bellflower Family

 

Lobelia anatina F. Wimmer: Apache Lobelia, Mountain Lobelia, Southwestern Blue Lobelia (terrestrial perennial herb (to 18 inches high); within range reported from mountains, meadows, seeps, springs, stream banks, marshes and wet soils 5,500 to 9,000 feet elevation; attracts bees and hummingbirds; useful as an ornamental)

 

Caprifoliaceae: The Honeysuckle Family

 

Symphoricarpos oreophilus A. Gray: Mountain Snowberry, Whortleleaf Snowberry (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub (under 5 feet high); within range reported from mountains, mesas, canyons, hillsides, slopes, forests, ravines, woodlands, meadows and edges of meadows, along streams and around ponds 5,500 to 9,000 feet elevation; the fruits are eaten by many species of birds and small mammals, valuable browse plant for deer; useful as an ornamental)

 

Caryophyllaceae: The Pink Family

 

Arenaria lanuginosa (A. Michaux) P. Rohrbach subsp. saxosa (A. Gray) B. Maguire: Sandwort, Spreading Sandwort (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons, roadsides, springs, gulches and disturbed areas 7,000 to 12,000 feet elevation)

 

Silene scouleri W.J. Hooker (subsp. pringlei (S. Watson) C.L. Hitchcock & B. Maguire is the subspecies reported as occurring in Arizona, Silene pringlei S. Watson): Scouler’s Catchfly, Simple Campion, Simple Catchfly (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, slopes, forests and meadows 5,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Chenopodiaceae: The Goosefoot Family

 

Atriplex canescens (F.T. Pursh) T. Nuttall: Cenizo, Chamiso, Chamiso Cenizo, Chamiza, Costilla de Vaca, Four-wing Saltbush, Narrow-leaf Saltbush, Narrowleaf Wingscale, Thinleaf Fourwing Saltbush, Grey Sage Brush, Orache, Saladillo, Wngscale (terrestrial perennial evergreen shrub (3 to 6 feet high); within range reported from rocky slopes, gravelly and sandy flats and along washes below 6,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental and in controlling erosion; larval food plant for the Pygmy Blue, Brefidium exile)

 

Commelinaceae: The Spiderwort Family

 

Commelina dianthifolia A.R. Delile: Birdbill Dayflower (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, mesas, canyons, slopes, ridge tops, among rocks and boulders, rocky hillsides, meadows and along streams 3,500 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Convolvulaceae: The Morning-glory Family

 

Ipomoea tenuiloba J. Torrey: Spiderleaf, Trumpet Morning-glory (terrestrial perennial herb or vine; within range reported from mountains, mountainsides, slopes, meadows, woodlands, soil pockets on rock outcrops, grasslands, along streams and rocky soils 4,000 to 7,600 feet elevation)

 

Jacquemontia pringlei A. Gray: Pringle’s Clustervine (terrestrial perennial vine, subshrub or shrub; within range reported from desert mountains, canyons, rocky slopes, rocky outcrops, among rocks, rocky crevices, woodlands, draws, desertscrubs, along streams and riparian areas 3,000 to 4,500 feet elevation)

 

Cupressaceae: The Cypress Family

 

Cupressus arizonica E.L. Greene: Arizona Cypress, Cedro Blanco, Rough-bark Arizona Cypress, Smooth Arizona Cypress, Smooth-bark Arizona Cypress, Smooth Cypress (terrestrial perennial evergreen tree (to 30 to 90 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons, woodlands, riparian forests and woodlands and rocky soils 3,500 to 7,200 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Juniperus deppeana E.G. von Steudel: Alligator Bark Juniper, Alligator Juniper, Checker Bark Juniper, Western Juniper (terrestrial perennial evergreen shrub or tree (20 to 65 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons, forests, rocky slopes, rocky hillsides, woodlands, grasslands, along washes and rocky soils 4,200 to 8,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental with older trees having considerable character; birds and mammals feed on the berries)

 

Cyperaceae: The Sedge Family

 

Carex athrostachya S.T. Olney: Slenderbeak Sedge (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyon bottoms, forests, wet meadows, draws, along washes and streams and around ponds and lakes 6,200 to 8,500 feet elevation)

 

Carex chihuahuensis K.K. MacKenzie: Chihuahuan Sedge, Sedge (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons and canyon bottoms, among rocks, wet meadows, desertscrubs, valleys, springs, along rivers, cienegas, riparian forests and woodlands and damp sands 3,600 to 6,000 feet elevation)

 

Carex occidentalis D.K. Bailey: Oklahoma Sedge, Western Sedge (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons, slopes, rock outcrops, meadows, springs, muddy soil, gulches, creeks, sandy streambeds, waterfalls, cienegas, tanks, lakes  6,500 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Carex subfusca W. Boott: Brown Sedge (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, springs, seeps, creeks, streams, cienegas, edges of pools, tanks and lakes and moist and wet soils 3,500 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Carex vallicola C. Dewey (var. rusbyi (K.K. MacKenzie) F.J. Hermann. is the variety of Carex vallicola reported from Arizona) (Carex rusbyi Mackenzie): Rusby Sedge, Valley Sedge (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons, deep shade on dry slopes, gravelly slopes among boulders, springs, moist soil along creeks, along streams and stream beds and shorelines of lakes 7,000 to 9,500 feet elevation) 

 

Cyperus fendlerianus J.O. Boeckeler: Fendler’s Faltsedge, Fendler Nutgrass, Tuberroot Flatsedge (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons, slopes, ridge tops, gravelly ridges, among rocks, meadows, springs, creeks and creek terraces, along streams and shallow depressions 4,500 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Dennstaedtaceae: The Bracken Fern Family

 

Pteridium aquilinum (C. Linnaeus) F.A. Kuhn (var. pubescens L.M. Underwood is the variety reported as occurring in Arizona): Bracken, Brake, Downy Bracken-fern, Hairy Brackenfern, Pasture Brake, Western Bracken, Western Bracken-fern (terrestrial perennial herb (to 4 feet high); within range reported from mountains, slopes, forests and woodlands, meadows, flats and dry and moist soils 5,000 to 8,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental, a post-fire successional plant)

 

Dryopteridaceae: The Wood Fern Family

 

Athyrium filix-femina (C. Linnaeus) A.W. Roth subsp. cyclosorum (F.J. Ruprecht) C.F. Christensen (Athyrium filix-femina (C. Linnaeus) A.W. Roth,  var. californicum Butters is the variety reported as occurring in Arizona): Lady Fern, Subarctic Ladyfern (terrestrial perennial herb (to 3 feet high); within range reported from shaded areas cracks in boulders, around springs and along streams 7,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Woodsia neomexicana M.D. Windham (Woodsia mexicana A.L. Fée:): Mexican Cliff Fern, New Mexico Cliff Fern (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, crevices in cliffs, rocky slopes, recesses under boulders and bases of rocks 3,500 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Ericaceae: The Heath Family

 

Arbutus arizonica (A. Gray) C.S. Sargent: Arizona Madrone, Arizona Madrono (terrestrial perennial evergreen tree (to over 50 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyon bottoms, slopes, woodlands and riparian woodlands 4,000 to 8,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Arctostaphylos pringlei C.C. Parry subsp. pringlei: Manzanita, Pinkbract Manzanita, Pringle Manzanita (terrestrial perennial evergreen shrub or tree (to 6 feet high); within range reported from slopes and scrubs 4,000 to 6,000 feet elevation; fruits are eaten by bears, birds and other animals; useful as an ornamental)

 

Arctostaphylos pungens K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland & Kunth: Bearberry, Manzanilla, Mexican Manzanita, Pinguica, Pointleaf Manzanita (terrestrial perennial evergreen subshrub or shrub (to 6 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyon bottoms, bases of cliffs, gravelly slopes, forests, woodlands, scrubs, plains, grasslands, along washes and floodplains 3,400 to 8,000 feet elevation; the Broad-tailed Hummingbird (Selasphorus platycercus) and White-eared Hummingbird (Hylocharis leucotis) have been observed visiting the flowers; fruits are eaten by bears, birds and other animals; useful as an ornamental)

 

Euphorbiaceae: The Spurge Family

 

Manihot davisiae L.C. Croizat: Arizona Cassava, Arizona Manihot (terrestrial perennial shrub; mountains, canyons, rocky hillsides, stony slopes and grasslands 2,000 to 4,000 feet elevation)

 

Fabaceae (Leguminosae): The Pea Family

 

Dalea filiformis A. Gray: Sonoran Prairie Clover (terrestrial annual herb; within range reported from mountains, grasslands and soil pockets on rock outcrops 3,500 to 8,000 feet elevation)

 

Dalea lumholtzii B.L. Robinson & M.L. Fernald: Lumholtz’s Prairie Clover (terrestrial perennial herb or subshrub; within range reported from mountains, gravelly slopes, woodlands and rocky flats 3,500 to 7,000 feet elevation)

 

Dalea polygonoides A. Gray: Sixweeks Dalea, Sixweeks Prairie Clover (terrestrial annual herb; within range reported from mountains, slopes, ridges, soil pockets on rock outcrops, knolls, gulches, meadows, flats and roadsides 5,500 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Desmodium arizonicum S. Watson: Arizona Ticktrefoil, Beggar-ticks (terrestrial annual herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons, divides, slopes, hillsides and gulches 4,000 to 8,000 feet elevation)

 

Desmodium grahamii A. Gray: Graham’s Tick Clover, Graham’s Ticktrefoil (terrestrial perennial herb (sprawling to 2 feet wide, flowering stem to 15 inches high); within range reported from mountains, hillsides, shaded slopes, forests and clearings 4,500 to 8,000 feet elevation)

 

Lathyrus graminifolius (S. Watson) J. White: Grassleaf Pea, Grassleaf Pea Vine, Grassleaf Vetchling (terrestrial herbaceous vine; within range reported from mountains, shaded slopes and gulches 4,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Melilotus alba F.K. Medikus: White Sweetclover (terrestrial annual, winter annual, biennial or perennial herb; within range reported from roadsides, along creeks, waste places, disturbed areas and moist sandy soils below 7,800 feet elevation. EXOTIC Invasive Plant)

 

Melilotus officinalis (C. Linnaeus) J.B. de Lamarck:  Yellow Sweetclover (terrestrial annual, winter annual, biennial or perennial herb; within range reported from roadsides, waste places and disturbed areas below 7,500 feet elevation. EXOTIC Invasive Plant)

 

Phaseolus grayanus (E.O. Wooten) P.C. Standley: Gray’s Bean, Gray Limabean (terrestrial annual or perennial herb or vine; within range reported from mountains, canyons, rocky slopes, clearings in forests and gulches 5,000 to 8,500 feet elevation)

 

Phaseolus parvulus E.L. Greene: Pinos Altos Mountain Bean (terrestrial perennial herb or vine; within range reported from mountains, forests, among rocks and rich soils 6,500 to 8,500 feet elevation)

 

Robinia neomexicana A. Gray: New Mexican Locust, New Mexico Locust, Southwestern Locust (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub or tree (to 25 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons, slopes, floodplains and waste places 4,000 to 8,500 feet elevation; of special value in reducing erosion; the Broad-tailed Hummingbird (Selasphorus platycercus) has been observed visiting the flowers, the flowers are large, showy and fragrant; the foliage is browsed by wildlife; useful as an ornamental, the bark, roots and seeds are reported to be poisonous)

 

Trifolium pinetorum E.L. Greene: Pinewoods Clover, Woods Clover (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, forests, meadows, seeps, springs, streambanks and damp and moist soils 6,500 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Vicia pulchella K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth: Showy Vetch, Sweetclover Vetch (terrestrial perennial herb or vine; within range reported from mountains and forests 6,000 to 8,500 feet elevation)

 

Fagaceae: The Beech Family

 

Quercus arizonica C.S. Sargent: Arizona Oak, Arizona White Oak, Roble (terrestrial perennial evergreen shrub or tree (30 to 60 or more feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons, slopes, woodlands and foothills 5,000 to7,600 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental, one of the largest of the southwestern oaks)

 

Quercus emoryi J. Torrey: Blackjack Oak, Black Oak, Bellota, Emory Oak (terrestrial perennial evergreen shrub or tree (to 50 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons and canyon bottoms, ridges, slopes, woodlands and foothills 3,000 to 8,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; the acorns “bellotas” are eaten by wildlife and the leaves are browsed by deer)

 

Quercus gambelii T. Nuttall var. gambelii: Gambel Oak, Rocky Mountain White Oak, Utah White Oak (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub or tree (7 to 70 feet high); within range reported from mountains, plateaus, canyon bottoms, slopes, foothills and valleys 5,000 to 8,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; leaves are browsed by deer, the acorns are eaten by wildlife)

 

Quercus hypoleucoides A. Camus: Silverleaf Oak, Whiteleaf Oak (terrestrial perennial evergreen shrub or tree (30 to 65 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons, woodlands, and slopes 5,000 to 8,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Quercus rugosa L. Née, (Quercus reticulata F.W. von Humbolt & A.J. Bonpland): Netleaf Oak (terrestrial perennial evergreen shrub or tree (6 to 40 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons, gravelly slopes, gulches, ravines and woodlands 4,000 to 8,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; wildlife feed on the acorns)

 

Garryaceae: The Silktassel Family

 

Garrya wrightii J. Torrey: Coffeeberry-bush, Feverbush, Grayleaf Dogwood, Quinine-bush, Wright’s Silktassel (terrestrial perennial shrub (to 15 feet high); within range reported from canyons, rocky slopes, woodlands, scrubs and grasslands 3,000 to 8,000 feet elevation; plants are browsed by deer and Bighorn Sheep; useful as an ornamental)

 

Geraniaceae: The Geranium Family

 

Geranium caespitosum T.P. James var. eremophilum (E.O. Wooton & P.C. Standley) W.C. Martin & C.R. Hutchins (Geranium eremophilum E.O. Wooton & P.C. Standley): Purple Cluster Geranium (terrestrial perennial herb or subshrub (to 18 inches tall); within range reported from mountains and forests 4,500 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Geranium richardsonii F.E. von Fischer & E.R. von Trautvetter: Cranesbill, Richardson’s Geranium, White Crane’s-bill, White Geranium (terrestrial perennial herb (to 18 inches high); within range reported from mountains, shaded slopes and gulches 6,500 to 11,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Hydrophyllaceae: The Waterleaf Family

 

Phacelia egena (E.L. Greene ex A. Brand) E.L. Greene ex J.T. Howell (Phacelia magellanica (J.B. de Lamarck) F.V. Coville p.p.): Kaweah River Phacelia; Kaweah River Scorpion-weed; Varileaf Phacelia (terrestrial biennial or perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, rocky slopes, forests and burn sites and along streams 4,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Iridaceae: The Iris Family

 

Sisyrinchium arizonicum J.T. Rothrock: Arizona Blue-eyed Grass, Yellow-eyed Grass (terrestrial perennial herb (to 2 feet tall); within range reported from mountains and forests 6,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Juncaceae: The Rush Family

 

Juncus effusus C. Linnaeus (subsp. austrocalifornicaus?): Common Rush (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains and wet soils near springs and pools 4,600 to 8,000 feet elevation)

 

Juncus saximontanus A. Nelson (Juncus ensifolius J.E. Wikström var. brunnescens (P.A. Rydberg) A.J. Cronquist, Juncus ensifolius J.E. Wikström var. montanus (G. Engelmann) C.L. Hitchcock): Rocky Mountain Rush, Three-stemmed Rush (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, moist meadows and wet soils 4,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Juglandaceae: The Walnut Family

 

Juglans major (J. Torrey) A.A. Heller: Arizona Black Walnut, Arizona Walnut, Nogal, Nogal Cimarron, Nogal Encarcelado, Nogal Silvestre (terrestrial perennial deciduous tree (30 to 50 feet high); within range reported from canyons, creeks, streams and rivers 3,500 to 7,000 feet elevation, 1,930 and 2,050 feet elevation at remnant sites in Marana; useful as an ornamental when used as a specimen plant in a large area (requires an ever increasingly large amount of water with age) and as a revegetation plant for the areas immediately adjacent to the main channel of creeks, streams and rivers)

 

Lamiaceae (Labiatae): The Mint Family

 

Hedeoma dentata J. Torrey: Dentate False Pennyroyal, Mock-pennyroyal (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from gravelly slopes 4,000 to 7,500 feet elevation)

 

Hedeoma hyssopifolia A. Gray: Aromatic False Pennyroyal, Sweet Sent (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from canyons, slopes and forests 5,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Monarda citriodora J. de Cervantes ex M. Lagasca y Segura subsp. austromontana (C.C. Epling) R.W. Scora (Monarda austromontana C.C. Epling): Lemon Beebalm (terrestrial annual or biennial herb; within range reported from mountains, mesas and slopes 4,000 to 8,500 feet elevation)

 

Prunella vulgaris C. Linnaeus: Carpenterweed, Common Selfheal, Heal-all (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, meadows, roadsides, along streams, lake shores and moist soils 5,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Liliaceae: The Lily Family

 

Dasylirion wheeleri S. Watson: Cactus Spoon, Common Sotol, Desert Spoon, Sotol, Spoon Flower, Spoon Plant, Wheeler Dasylirion, Wheeler Sotol (terrestrial perennial evergreen subshrub or shrub (under 8 feet high with a flowering spike reaching to 15 feet in height); within range reported from mesas, canyons, rocky slopes, ridges, bajadas and rocky and gravelly hillsides 4,000 to 6,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; browsed by bighorn sheep)

 

Echeandia flavescens (J.A. & J.H. Schultes) R.W. Cruden (Anthericum torreyi J.G. Baker p.p.): Amber Lily, Crag-lily, Torrey’s Craglily (terrestrial perennial herb (to 16 inches high); within range reported from mountains, canyons, forests, woodlands, soil pockets on rock outcrops and along streams 4,700 to 9,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Nolina microcarpa S. Watson: Bear Grass, Palmilla, Sacahuista, Small-seed Nolina, Sotol Chiquito (terrestrial perennial evergreen subshrub or shrub (under 7 feet high with a flowering spike reaching to 8 feet in height); within range reported from mesas, canyons, rock outcrops, hills, sandy and gravelly slopes, bajadas, plains, flats and valleys 3,000 to 6,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Linaceae: The Flax Family

 

Linum neomexicanum E.L. Greene: New Mexico Yellow Flax (terrestrial annual, biennial or perennial herb (to 2 feet high); within range reported from mountains, forests, gravelly slopes and flats 4,500 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Nyctaginaceae: The Four-o’clock Family

 

Allionia incarnata C. Linnaeus: Guapile, Herba de la Hormiga, Pink Three-flower, Trailing Allionia, Trailing Four O’Clock, Trailing Windmills, Umbrella Wort, Windmills (terrestrial perennial herb (stems trail to 10 feet long); within range reported from mesas, rocky slopes, flats, sandy plains, along washes, roadsides and disturbed sites below 6,000 feet elevation)

 

Epilobium ciliatum C.S. Rafinesque subsp. ciliatum (Epilobium adenocaulon H.C. Haussknecht): Fringed Wiloowherb, Hairy Willowherb, Hairy Willoweed, Transpecos Willowherb (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, meadows, flats, seeps, springs, along creeks and streams, cienegas and moist and wet soils 4,000 to 9,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Mirabilis albida (T. Walter) A. Heimerl: Mountain Four-o’clock, White Four O’clock (terrestrial perennial herb or subshrub; within range reported from mountains, canyons, cliff faces, rocky hillsides, forests, woodlands, washes and dry sandy areas 3,300 to 8,800 feet elevation)

 

Oenothera elata K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth subsp. hirsutissima (A. Gray ex S Watson) W. Dietrich: (Oenothera hookeri J. Torrey & A. Gray subsp. hewettii T.D. Cockerell,  Oenothera hookeri J. Torrey & A. Gray subsp. hirsutissima (A. Gray ex S Watson) P.A. Munz): Hooker’s Evening Primrose, Yellow Flowered Evening-primrose (terrestrial biennial or perennial herb (to 4 feet high); within range reported from damp places in mountains, slopes, clearings in forests and woodlands, plains, roadsides, springs, streambeds and pools 3,500 to 9,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Oenothera pubescens C.L. von Wildenow ex C.P. Sprengel (Oenothera laciniata J. Hill var pubescens (C.L. von Wildenow) P.A. Munz): Silky Evening-primrose, South American Evening-primrose (terrestrial annual or perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, ridge tops, rocky slopes, forests, meadows, grasslands, flats and moist soils 1,500 to 9,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Orchidaceae: The Orchid Family

 

Listera convallarioides (O. Swartz) T. Nuttall ex S. Elliott: Broadleaf Twayblade, Broadlipped Twayblade (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains 8,000 feet elevation)

 

Malaxis macrostachya (J.L. de Lexarza) Kuntze C.E. (Malaxis soulei L.O. Williams): Adder’s Mouth, Chiricahua Adder’s-mouth Orchid, Mountain Malaxis, Rattail (terrestrial perennial herb (to 6 inches high); within range reported from mountains, escarpments and forests 6,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Malaxis tenuis (S. Watson) O. Ames: Arizona Adder’s-mouth Orchid, Slender Adders Mouth (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains 7,000 feet elevation)

 

Platanthera limosa J. Lindley (Habenaria limosa (J. Lindley) W.B. Hemsley: Thurber’s Bog Orchid (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains 7,000 to 8,000 feet elevation)

 

Pineaceae: The Pine Family

 

Abies concolor (G. Gordon & R. Glendinning) J. Lindley ex F.H. Hildebrand: Balsam Fir, Concolor Fir, Silver Fir, White Balsam, White Fir (terrestrial perennial evergreen tree (to 150 feet high): within range reported from high mountains, in moist and rocky soils and on steep shaded slopes 5,500 to 10,000 feet elevation; porcupines gnaw on the bark, deer and grouse feed on the foliage, the seeds are eaten by birds and mammals; useful as an ornamental)

 

Pinus arizonica G. Engelmann var. arizonica (Pinus ponderosa P. & C. Lawson var. arizonica (G. Engelmann) G.R. Shaw): Arizona Pine, Arizona Ponderosa Pine, Arizona Yellow Pine Ponderosa Pine Yellow Pine, Western Yellow Pine, Yellow Pine (terrestrial perennial evergreen tree (80 to 150 feet high); within range reported from high mountains, canyons, slopes and ridges 3,500 to 9,500 feet elevation; the seeds are eaten by wildlife; useful as an ornamental)

 

Pinus discolor D.K. Bailey & F.G. Hawksworth (Pinus cembroides J.G. Zuccarini var. bicolor E.L. Little): Border Pinyon, Nut Pine, Pino, Pinonero, Pinyon Pine (terrestrial perennial evergreen tree (15 to 50 feet high); within range reported from mountains, mesas, plateaus, rocky slopes, among boulders and along streambeds 5,000 to 7,500 feet elevation; the seeds are eaten by wildlife; useful as an ornamental)

 

Pinus flexilis T.P. James: Limber Pine, Rocky Mountain White Pine, White Pine, Limbertwig (terrestrial perennial evergreen tree (50 to 80 feet high); within range reported from mountains, rocky slopes, ridges and rocky, gravelly or sandy soils 6,500 to 10,000 feet elevation; leaves are browsed by deer and elk, birds and mammals feed on the nuts; useful as an ornamental)

 

Pinus leiophylla C.J. Schiede & F. Deppe var. chihuahuana (G. Engelmann) G.R. Shaw Pinus chihuahuana G. Engelmann): Chihuahuan Pine, Pino Real, Rough-barked Pitch Pine, White Pitch Pine, Yellow Pine (terrestrial perennial evergreen tree (30 to 80 feet high); within range reported from mountains, slopes, forests and benches 5,000 to 7,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Pinus ponderosa P. & C. Lawson var. scopulorum G. Engelmann: Blackjack Pine, Interior Ponderosa Pine, Ponderosa Pine, Rocky Mountain Ponderosa Pine, Western Yellow Pine, Yellow Pine (terrestrial perennial evergreen tree (80 to 150 feet high); within range reported from high mountains, canyons, slopes and ridges 3,500 to 9,500 feet elevation; the seeds are eaten by wildlife; useful as an ornamental)

 

Pinus strobiformis G. Engelmann (Pinus flexilis T.P. James var. reflexa G. Engelmann, Pinus reflexa (G. Engelman) G. Engelmann: Border Limber Pine, Border White Pine, Mexican White Pine, Pino Enana, Pino Enano, Rocky Mountain White Pine, Southwestern White Pine, White Pine (terrestrial perennial evergreen tree (60 to 100 feet high); within range reported from high mountains, canyons, slopes and ridges 6,500 to 10,000 feet elevation; the seeds are eaten by wildlife; useful as an ornamental)

 

Pseudotsuga menziesii (C.F. de Mirbel) J.F. do Amaral Franco var. glauca (Pseudotsuga taxifolia var. glauca (L. Beissner) G.B. Sudworth): Blue Douglas-fir, Common Douglas-fir, Douglas-fir, Douglas Spruce, Oregon Pine, Red Fir, Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir, Yellow Fir (terrestrial perennial evergreen tree (to 190 feet high); within range reported from high mountains, canyons, north facing slopes and ravines 5,000 to 10,000 feet elevation; foliage is browsed by deer, elk and grouse, birds and mammals eat the seeds; useful as an ornamental)

 

Platanaceae: The Planetree Family

 

Platanus wrightii S. Watson (Platanus racemosa T. Nuttall var. wrightii (S. Watson) L. Benson): Arizona Planetree, Arizona Sycamore, Buttonwood, Plane Tree (terrestrial perennial deciduous tree (40 to 80 feet); within range reported from rocky canyons and along creeks and streams 2,000 to 6,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental when used as a specimen plant in a large area (requires an ever increasingly large amount of water with age) and as a revegetation plant for the areas immediately adjacent to the main channel of creeks, streams and rivers; valuable in preventing erosion along stream banks)

 

Poaceae (Gramineae): The Grass Family

 

Agrostis scabra C.L. von Willdenow: Rough Bentgrass, Tickle Grass (terrestrial perennial herb (12 to 32 inches tall); within range reported from mountains, forests, meadows, moist seeps, along streams, around lakes, riparian forests and dry gravelly and moist soils 5,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Agrostis stolonifera C. Linnaeus (Agrostis palustris W. Hudson): Carpet Bentgrass, Creeping Bent, Creeping Bentgrass, Redtop, Redtop Bent, Seaside Bentgrass, Spreading Bent (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, shaded slopes, forests, swales, meadows, grasslands, springs, along washes, streams and rivers, bogs, riparian areas and moist soils 5,800 to 10,800 feet elevation. EXOTIC Invasive Plant)

 

Avena fatua C. Linnaeus: Flaxgrass, Oatgrass, Wheat Oats, Wild Oat (terrestrial winter annual herb; within range reported from rocky slopes, sandy bajadas, roadsides, along washes, low-lying areas and disturbed areas below 8,250 feet elevation. EXOTIC Invasive Plant)

 

Bromus ciliatus C. Linnaeus var. richardsonii (J.H. Link) L.H. Boivin (Bromus richardsonii J.H. Link): Fringed Brome, Fringed Bromegrass (terrestrial perennial herb (18 to 36 inches tall); within range reported from mountains, forests, slopes, clearings and woodlands 5,600 to 11,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Bromus tectorum C. Linnaeus var. tectorum: Broncograss, Cheatgrass, Cheatgrass Brome, Downy Brome, Downy Chess, Early Chess, Military Grass, Slender Chess, Wild Oats (terrestrial annual herb; within range reported from slopes, roadsides and disturbed areas 4,800 to 8,500 feet elevation. EXOTIC Invasive Plant; poses a significant threat to native habitat)

 

Deschampsia elongata (W.J. Hooker) W. Munro: Slender Hairgrass (terrestrial perennial herb (12 to 40 inches tall); within range reported from mountains, slopes, hillsides, meadows, open ground, seeps, streambeds and along washes and streams 4,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Elymus arizonicus (F.L. Scribner & J.G. Smith) F.W. Gould (Agropyron arizonicum F.L. Scribner & J.G. Smith): Arizona Wheatgrass (terrestrial perennial herb (4 to 12 inches tall); within range reported from mountains, shaded canyons, rocky slopes, forests, clearings and moist stream banks 5,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Koeleria macrantha (C.F. von Ledebour) J.A. Shultes (Koeleria nitida T. Nuttall): Mountain Junegrass, Prairie Junegrass (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, rocky and gravelly slopes, open forests, woodlands, plains and rocky soil 4,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Muhlenbergia elongata F.L. Scribner ex W.J. Beal (Muhlenbergia xerophila C.O. Goodding: Sycamore Canyon Muhly, Sycamore Muhy, Weeping Muhly (terrestrial perennial herb(6 to 20 inches tall); within range reported from mountains, canyons and canyon bottoms, cliffs, rocky slopes,crevices, woodlands, gravelly slopes, seeps and riparian forests 4,000 to 6,000 feet elevation)

 

Panicum bulbosum K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth: Bulb Panicgrass, Bulb Panicum (terrestrial perennial herb (20 to 48 inches tall); within range reported from mountains, rocky canyons, slopes, forests, hills, woodlands, streambeds and moist soils 4,500 to 8,200 feet elevation)

 

Piptochaetium pringlei (W.J. Beal) L.R. Parody (Stipa pringlei (W.J. Beal) F.L. Scribner): Pringle Needlegrass, Pringle’s Speargrass (terrestrial perennial herb (16 to 48 inches tall); within range reported from mountains, gravelly slopes, forests, clearings, woodlands, meadows and rocky slopes 5,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Polygonaceae: The Buckwheat Family

 

Polygonum aviculare C. Linnaeus: Prostrate Knotweed (terrestrial long lived annual or perennial herb; within range reported from gravelly flats, roadsides, shorelines and disturbed areas 1,000 to 8,000 feet elevation. EXOTIC Invasive Plant)

 

Rumex obtusifolius C. Linnaeus: Bitter Dock, Broadleaf Dock (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, wet meadows and waste areas below 8,000 feet elevation. EXOTIC Invasive Plant)

 

Pteridaceae: The Maidenhair Fern Family

(listed genera formerly placed in the Polypodiaceae: The Fern Family)

 

Cheilanthes fendleri W.J. Hooker: Fendler’s Lipfern (terrestrial perennial herb (to 7 inches high); within range reported from mountains, rocky slopes, cliffs, crevices, ledges and around boulders 4,000 to 9,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Cheilanthes tomentosa J.H. Link: Machoga, Machogaka, Woolly Lipfern (terrestrial perennial herb (to 8 inches high); within range reported from ledges, among boulders, shaded rocky places, talus slopes and crevices 4,000 to 7,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Notholaena lemmonii D.C. Eaton (Cheilanthes lemmonii (D.C. Eaton) K. Domin: Lemmon’s Cloak Fern (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from rocky slopes, among boulders and in crevices at about 4,000 feet elevation)

 

Pellaea wrightiana W.J. Hooker: Wright’s Cliffbrake (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from cliffs, rocky slopes, rock crevices, talus slopes and among rocks (3,000 to 8,000 feet elevation)

 

Ranunculaceae: The Buttercup Family

 

Aquilegia chrysantha A. Gray: Golden Columbine, Yellow Columbine (terrestrial perennial herb (to 4 feet high0; within range reported from mountains, forests, seeps, along streams and rich and moist soils 3,000 to 11,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Thalictrum dasycarpum F.E. von Fischer & J.L. Avé-Lallemant: Purple Meadow-rue (terrestrial perennial herb (to 3 feet high); within range reported from mountains at about 6,000 feet elevation)

 

Thalictrum fendleri G. Engelmann ex A. Gray: Fendler’s Meadow-rue (terrestrial perennial herb (to 3 feet high); within range reported from mountains, rocky slopes, forests and streambeds 5,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Rhamnaceae: The Buckthorn Family

 

Ceanothus fendleri A. Gray: Buck-brush, Deer-brier, Deerbrush, Fendler Buckbrush, Fendler’s Ceanothus (terrestrial perennial shrub (to 6 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons, forests, slopes, ravines, woodlands, meadows, scrubs and gulches 5,000 to 10,000 feet elevation; plants are browsed by deer, porcupines and rabbits)

 

Rosaceae: The Rose Family

 

Agrimonia striata A. Michaux: Roadside Agrimony, Woodland Grooveburr (terrestrial perennial herb (to 6 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons,  rich soil in pine forests, meadows,  flats, roadsides, springs, creeks, rivers, along streams, gulches and watersheds 6,500 to 8,500 feet elevation)

 

Holodiscus dumosus (T. Nuttall ex W.J. Hooker) F.X. Heller (Holodiscus discolor (F.T. Pursh) C.J. Maximowicz var. dumosus (T. Nuttall ex W.J. Hooker) C.J. Maximowicz ex T. Coulter): Bush Rock Spirea, Cream-bush, Foam-bush, Glandular Oceanspray, Mountain Spray, Ocean Spray, Rockspirea, Rush Rock Spirea, Shrubby Cream Bush (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub (to 10 feet in height); within range reported from mountains, cliffs and rocky slopes 5,500 to 10,000 feet elevation; browed by deer; useful as an ornamental)

 

Rubus idaeus C. Linnaeus subsp. strigosus (A. Michaux) Fooke (Rubus strigosus A. Michaux (variety arizonica (E.L. Greene) T.H. Kearney & R.H. Peebles is the variety reported as occurring in Arizona)): Grayleaf Red Raspberry, Red Raspberry, Western Red Raspberry, Wild Red Raspberry (terrestrial perennial shrub (to 5 feet high); within range reported from mountains and forests 7,000 to 11,500 feet elevation; fruits are eaten by birds and other wild animals)

 

Rubiaceae: The Madder Family

 

Galium mexicanum K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth subsp. asperinum (A. Gray) L.T. Dempster (Galium asperinum A. Gray): Mexican Bedstraw (terrestrial perennial herb or vine; within range reported from mountains, among rocks and along streeambeds 4,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Salicaceae: The Willow Family

 

Salix lasiolepis G. Bentham: Arroyo Willow, Narrowleaf Arroyo willow, White Willow (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub or tree (to 30 feet high); within range reported from mountains, foothills, valleys and along streams, arroyos and gullies 4,000 to 7,500 feet elevation)

 

Salix scouleriana J. Barratt ex W.J. Hooker: Black willow, Fire Willow, Mountain Willow, River Willow, Scouler’s Willow (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub or tree (to 30 feet high); within range reported from mountains, slopes, forests and clearings in forests, ravines and along streams 7,000 to 10,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; a revegetation plant for burned areas in forests, aids in controlling erosion; browed by deer)

 

Saxifragaceae: The Saxifrage Family

 

Heuchera rubescens J. Torrey var. versicolor (E.L. Greene) M.G. Stewart (Heuchera versicolor E.L. Greene): Pink Alumroot, Red Alumroot, Slimfruit Alumroot (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, on boulders, among rocks and moist soils 6,500 to 12,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Saxifraga eriophora S. Watson: Redfuzz Saxifrage (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, slopes, forests, recesses under boulders, among rocks, banks and in moist soils 5,000 to 8,800 feet elevation)

 

Scrophulariaceae: The Figwort Family

 

Castilleja austromontana P.C. Standley & J.C. Blumer: Rincon Indian Paintbrush, Rincon Mountain Indian Paintbrush (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons, rocky slopes, gulches, meadows and boggy areas 7,000 to 9,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Castilleja integra A. Gray: Wholeleaf Indian Paintbrush (terrestrial perennial subshrub or shrub; within range reported from woodlands and gravelly flats 3,000 to 7,600 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Mimulus guttatus A.P. de Condolle: Monkey-flower, Seep Monkeyflower, Yellow Monkey Flower (terrestrial annual or perennial herb; within range reported from moist sand in canyons, wet soil in seeps and springs, pools, along brooks and streams 500 to 9,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Penstemon discolor K. Keck: Catalina Beardtongue (terrestrial perennial subshrub or shrub (7 to 14 inches high); within range reported from mountains, canyons, woodlands, scrubs and soil pockets on rock outcrops 4,400 to 7,500 feet elevation)

 

Scrophularia parviflora E.O. Wooton & P.C. Standley: Pineland Figwort (terrestrial perennial herb (to 4 feet high); within range reported from mountains, forests, woodlands, clearings and disturbed areas 5,000 to 8,400 feet elevation)

 

Veronica sp.: Speedwell

 

Typhaceae: The Cat-tail Family

 

Typha latifolia C. Linnaeus: Broadleaf Cattail, Common Cattail, Espadilla, Tule (semi aquatic perennial herb; within range reported from along creeks and streams, sloughs, marshy areas in shallow water and at the edges of lakes and ponds 3,500 to 7,500 feet elevation)

 

Violaceae: The Violet Family

 

Viola canadensis C. Linnaeus: Canada Violet, Canadian White Violet (terrestrial perennial herb (4 to 16 inches); within range reported from mountains, canyons, canyon bottoms, shaded slopes and banks, rich moist soil in coniferous forests and shaded areas, aspen grooves, meadows, gulches and beside streams 6,000 to 11,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Viola umbraticola K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth (var. glaberrima J. Becker is the variety reported as occurring in Arizona): Ponderosa Violet, Shade Violet (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyon bottoms, hillsides, slopes, forests, woodlands, rock outcrops, shaded banks, riparian forests, gulches and rocky soils 5,200 to 7,800 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Viscaceae: The Christmas Mistletoe Family

(Loranthaceae: The Mistletoe Family)

 

Arceuthobium apachecum F.G. Hawksworth and D. Wiens: Apache Dwarf Mistletoe (terrestrial perennial subshrub or shrub; parasitic only on Pinus strobiformis, Southwestern White Pine below 9200 feet elevation)

 

Arceuthobium blumeri A. Nelson: Southwestern White Pine Dwarf Mistletoe (terrestrial perennial subshrub or shrub)

 

Vitaceae: The Grape Family

 

Vitis arizonica G. Engelmann: Arizona Grape, Canyon Grape, Parra Cimarrona, Parra del Monte, Vid (terrestrial perennial deciduous vine or woody climber; within range reported from canyons and along creeks, streams and watercourses 2,000 to 7,500 feet elevation)

 

 

 

LISTING OF ANIMALS

 

 

AMPHIBIANS

 

Ranidae: The Frog Family

 

Rana yavapaiensis (Platz and Frost): Lowland Leopard Frog, San Felipe Leopard Frog, Yavapai Leopard Frog (feeds on small invertebrates; reported from woodland, scrubland, grassland and wetland formations)

 

 

BIRDS

 

Accipitridae: The Eagle, Hawk, Kite and Allies Family

 

Accipiter gentilis Linnaeus: Goshawk, Northern Goshawk (feeds on birds and mammals; nest is a platform of sticks located in tall trees)

 

Accipiter striatus Vieillot: Galvilan Pajerero (Hispanic), Sharp-shinned Hawk; Wishag (feeds on birds and small mammals; nest is a platform of twigs located in trees)

 

Falconidae: The Caracara and Falcon Family

 

Falco peregrinus Tunstall subsp. anatum Boneparte: American Peregrine Falcon, Duck Hawk, Halcon Peregino (Hispanic), Peregrine Falcon (feeds on birds, insects and rodents; nests are made in potholes and scrapes or on sticks located on cliff ledges)

 

Strigidae: The Typical Owl Family

 

Strix occidentalis Xantus de Vesey subsp. lucida Nelson: Buho Manchado (Spanish), Mexican Spotted Owl, Spotted Owl, Tecolote Manchado Mexicano (Hispanic), Tecolote Moteado (Spanish) (feeds on small birds, insects, small mammals and reptiles; nests are located in canyon-wall caves and cavities, cliff caverns and ledges, rock hollows, tree cavities and abandoned hawk nests)

 

Tyrannidae: The Tyrant Flycatcher Family

 

Epidonax fulvifrons (Giraud) subsp. pygmaeus: Buff-breasted Flycatcher, Mosquerito Canelo (Hispanic), Northern Buff-breasted Flycatcher (feeds on flying insects; nests are camouflaged cups located on tree limbs)

 

 

INSECTS

 

Order Hymenoptera: Ants, Bees, Sawflies, Wasps and Others

 

Apidae: The Honeybee Family

 

Apis mellifera Linnaeus: African Honeybee, European Honeybee, Honeybee (found in bee boxes, buildings, water boxes and holes in ground, caves, cavities in saguaros, crevices, hollow trees logs. Introduced EXOTIC; domestic animal kept for crop pollination and for honey and beeswax production; feral honeybees, honeybees that have escaped and formed colonies in natural areas, may pose a threat to humans and wildlife)

 

Order Lepidoptera: Butterflies, Moths and Skippers

 

Hesperiidae: The Skipper Family

 

Agathymus aryxna (Dyar): Arizona Giant Skipper, Aryxna Agave Borer, Aryxna Giant Skipper (reported from mountains, rocky canyons, hillsides and grasslands; larvae are leaf borers feeding on agave leaves and stems)

 

Agathymus polingi Skinner: Amole Giant Skipper, Little Giant Skipper, Poling’s Agave Borer, Poling’s Giant Skipper (reported from mountains, hills, slopes and rocky flats; larvae are leaf borers feeding on agave leaves and stems)

 

Pieridae: The Sulfur Butterfly and White Family

 

Neophasia terlootii Behr: Chiricahua Pine White, Chiricahua White, Mexican Pine White, Terloot’s White (larvae feed on the leaves of Engelmann Spruce and Ponderosa Pine; reported from mountains)

 

Riodinidae: The Metalmark Family

               

Calephelis rawsoni subsp. arizonensis McAlpine: Arizona Metalmark, Arizona Metalmark Butterfly (feeds on species in the genus Bidens (Beggar Ticks and Bur Marigolds; reported from mountains, canyons, woodlands and riparian areas)

 

 

MAMMALS

 

Castoridae: Beaver

 

Castor canadensis Kuhle: American Beaver; Beaver; Beaver Castor (Hispanic) (found in aquatic habitats including creeks, streams, rivers, marshes, cienegas, ponds and lakes; feeds on bark, branches, buds, leaves or needles and twigs of alder, aspen, birch, cattail, cottonwood, maple, mesquite, tamarix and willow, and the roots of pond lilies and other tuberous plants; beaver dams help reduce erosion and provide habitat for other animals including otters and waterfowl; Beavers have been reported as having once been widespread in all of the permanent streams in Arizona, their distribution in Pima County is currently being investigated)

 

Muridae: The Mouse and Rat Family

 

Neotoma mexicana Baird: Mexican Wood Rat (feeds on acorns, berries including juniper berries, cacti, fungi, leaves and needles of green plants and nuts including pinyon nuts; nests are built in brush piles, buildings, cliffs, rock crevices, hollow trees and rock outcrops)

 

Sciuridae: The Squirrel and Allies Family

 

Sciurus arizonensis (Coues): Arizona Gray Squirrel, Grey Squirrel (feeds on acorns, berries, nuts, pine cones and seeds)

 

Ursidae: Bears

 

Ursus americanus (Baird) (Euarctos americanus (Pallus)): Black Bear, Oso Negro (feeds on acorns, ants, beetles, berries, buds, carrion, crickets, currants, fruit, grapes, grubs, insects, leaves, pinyon nuts, prickly-pear fruit, raspberries small to medium-size mammals and other vertebrates and twigs.

 

Ursus arctos (Linnaeus): Brown Bear, Grizzly Bear, Oso Gris (feeds on berries, carrion, fish, fungi, insects, leaves, mammals, roots and sprouts; reported from the Rincon and Santa Catalina Mountains and along the Santa Cruz River bottom from Nogales to Tucson. EXTIRPATED from Arizona)

 

Vespertilionidae: The Plain-nosed Bat Family

 

Lasionycteris noctivagins (Le Conte): Murcielago Plateado, Silver-haired Bat (feeds on caddis flies, flies, moths and other insects; uncommon tree dwelling bat found under bark, in bird nests, dead trees, fissures in rock ledges, tree hollows, and woodpecker holes)

 

 

REPTILES

 

Phrynosomatidae: The Horned Lizard Family

 

Phrynosoma hernandesi Bell: Greater Short-horned Lizard, Mountain Short-horned Lizard, Short-horned Lizard (feeds on ants, beetles, other insects and insect larvae and arachnids; reported from mountains, forests, woodlands, scrubs and plains)

 

 

 

Listing Footnotes

 

(1) National Geographic Arizona Seamless USGS Topographic Maps. Maps created with TOPO! R C 2002 National Geographic.

Mt. Lemmon, Arizona – 15 Minute Series Topographic 1957

                Bellota Ranch, Arizona – 15 Minute Series Topographic 1957

                               

(2) Walker, Henry P. and Don Bufkin. 1979. Historical Atlas of Arizona, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, Page 4A and Map.

 

(3) Richardson, M.L. and M.L. Miller. March 1974. United States Department of Agriculture - Soil Conservation Service in cooperation with the Pima County Natural Resource Conservation District, Report and interpretations for the General Soil Map of Pima County, Arizona and General Soil Map Pima County Arizona. Arizona General Soil Map, July 1975, United States Department of Agriculture - Soil Conservation Service and the University of Arizona Agricultural Experiment Station, compiled by J.E. Jay, Y.H. Havens, D.M. Hendricks, D.F. Post and C.W. Guernsey.

 

(4) Brown, David E., Biotic Communities of the American Southwest – United States and Mexico, Desert Plants, Volume 4, Numbers 1-4, Published by the University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum, 1982, and associated map: Brown, David E. and Charles H. Lowe, Biotic Communities of the Southwest, August 1980, General Technical Report RM-78, United Stated Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Revised June 1983

 

(5) Nomenclature generally follows that presented by The Biota of North America Program of the North Carolina Botanical Garden (BONAP) with A Synonymized Checklist of the Vascular Flora of the United States, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, Full Index 1998.

http://www.bonap.org/

http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/b98/check98.htm

 

(6) Growth habits generally coincide with that given by the National Plants Database. Common names identified in the database have been printed in bold lettering: USDA, NRCS. 2004. The PLANTS Database, Version 3.5 (http://plants.usda.gov). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA

 

 

 

Literature, References and Web Sites Cited, Consulted and Visited for Listings

 

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*Benson, Lyman and Robert A. Darrow. 1981. Trees and Shrubs of the Southwestern Deserts, The University of Arizona Press, Tucson, Arizona.

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*Bowers, Janice E. and Steven P. McLaughlin. 1987.  Flora and Vegetation of the Rincon Mountains, Pima County, Arizona, Desert Plants, Volume 8, Number 2.

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*Johnson, Matthew Brian. 2004. Cacti, other Succulents, and Unusual Xerophytes of Southern Arizona, Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum / Arizona Lithographers, Tucson, Arizona.

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*Krausman, Paul R. and Michael L. Morrison. 2003. Wildlife Ecology and Management, Santa Rita Experimental Range (1903 to 2002), USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-30.2003 Pages 59 thru 67.

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*Little, Elbert L. 1980. The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Trees – Western Region, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, New York.

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*McLaughlin, Steven P. July 18, 1990. Flora of Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge (including Arivaca Cienega), Office of Arid Land Studies, University of Arizona.

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*Milne, Lorus and Margery. 1980. The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Insects and Spiders, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, New York.

*Minckly, W. L. 1973. Fishes of Arizona, Sims Printing Company, Inc., Phoenix, Arizona.

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