December 7, 2005 Update

 

 

TOWNSHIP 11 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, PIMA COUNTY, ARIZONA

Gila and Salt River Baseline and Meridian

 

 

Major Contributors and Sources: Matthew B. Johnson, Program Manager and Curator of the Desert Legume Program - Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum. William T. Kendall. Arizona Game and Fish Department, Heritage Data Management System - Special Status Species Reports. Southwest Environmental Information Network (SEINet).

 

 

Species Distribution Lists are being developed to encourage and promote the conservation of local native animals and plants. They are developed for legally defined geographic areas, and larger bodies of water. They are provided to environmental consultants, property owners, and government agencies interested in promoting conservation. Listings include species reported as having been observed in or reported from the described area.

 

Due to continuing additions and corrections the listings should be considered a work in progress. Species once reported as having occurred within the described area, but that no longer occurs there are shown are having been EXTIRPATED. This list includes species that are not native to Arizona (EXOTIC). Exotic plants are not recommended for use in landscaping or restoration projects. Disjunct species, outliers and plants on the edge of the main population, as observed by the surveyor, are noted as being PERIPHERAL PLANT(S). Landscaped plants are not included in the listings unless they have become naturalized in the surrounding native environment.

 

Local native vegetation is recommended for use in landscaping and restoration projects. To determine what could be considered as local native vegetation look at both the project township and the eight contiguous townships for plants of similar habitat and elevation. Plants should be planted in their approximate original habitat and density. Use of native plants encourages native animals to remain in the area and helps to retain the areas natural beauty, unique identity and heritage.

 

Appreciation is expressed to the officers and staff of the Arizona Department of Agriculture, the Arizona Game and Fish Department, Pima County and local government offices for the protection provided to our native animals and plants.

 

Species Distribution Lists are periodically updated and revised. These listings have been created and maintained by William T. Kendall. Comments, the reporting of corrections, the reporting of unrecorded species in townships and the reporting of information relating to the historical distribution of species would be greatly appreciated, and may be sent by mail to: Kendall Environmental Surveys, P.O. Box 87967, Tucson, Arizona 85754-7967, or E-mail to: KendallEnvironmentalSurveys@msn.com.

 

 

DISCLAIMER: The information presented as township notes has been obtained from large scale mapping and should be used only as a general guide. Information used in these lists is accepted from biologists and individuals interested in helping to promote the conservation of our natural resources. Mistakes are made in the identification of species and in the recording of information, and changes in nomenclature occur. For these reasons I can not and do not warrant the accuracy of these listings.

 

 

CAUTION: Many native desert plants have sharp thorns and spines. Care should be given when handling them and consideration should be given to public safety at sites where they are to be planted.

 

 

 

This photograph was taken looking west into Marshall Gulch. WTK August 2005

 

The following are a few of the plants reported from this township that might be useful in landscaping and restoration projects. Trees and Large Shrubs:  Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa), Arizona Pine (Pinus arizonica var. arizonica), White Fir (Abies concolor), Southwestern White Pine (Pinus strobiformis), Arizona Alder (Alnus oblongifolia), Quaking Aspen (Populus tremuloides var. aurea), Gambel Oak (Quercus gambelii), Boxelder (Acer negundo), Bigtooth Maple (Acer grandidentatum), Velvet Mesquite (Prosopis velutina), Rocky Mountain Maple (Acer glabrum var. neomexicanum), Scouler Willow (Salix scouleriana), Ocotillo (Fouquieria splendens), Mountain Yucca (Yucca schottii), Rock Spirea (Holodiscus dumosus), Whitethorn Acacia (Acacia constricta), Redosier Dogwood (Cornus sericea subsp. sericea) and Fivepetal Cliffbush (Jamesia americana).Vines and Climbers: Arizona Honeysuckle (Lonicera arizonica). Shrubs and Large Grasses: Wilcox Barberry (Berberis wilcoxii), Arizona Yucca (Yucca baccata var. brevifolia), Desert Pricklypear Cactus (Opuntia engelmannii var. engelmannii), Golden-flowered Agave (Agave chrysantha) and Fairy Duster (Calliandra eriophylla var. eriophylla). Subshrubs, Herbs and Small Succulents: Slendertube Skyrocket (Ipomopsis tenuituba), Hairy Brakenfern (Pteridium aquilinum var. pubescens), Subarctic Ladyfern (Athyrium filix-femina subsp. cyclosorum), Orcutt Threeawn (Aristida schiedeana var. orcuttiana), Hooker Evening Primrose (Oenothera elata subsp. hirsutissima), Beardlip Penstemon (Penstemon barbatus), Golden Columbine (Aquilegia chrysantha), Bulb Panicgrass (Panicum bulbosum), Scarlet Gilia (Ipomopsis aggregata subsp. aggregata), Western Yarrow (Achillea millefolium var. occidentalis), Mountain Lobelia (Lobelia anatina), Coral Bells (Heuchera sanguinea), Pink Alumroot (Heuchera rubescens var. versicolor), Screwleaf Muhly (Muhlenbergia virescens), Crimson Bluestem (Schizachyrium sanguineum var. hirtiflorum), Rincon Mountain Indian Paintbrush (Castilleja austromontana), Fowl Bluegrass (Poa palustris), Purple Meadow-rue (Thalictrum dasycarpum), Fendler Meadow-rue (Thalictrum fendleri), False Solomon-seal (Maianthemum racemosum subsp. racemosum), Starflower (Maianthemum stellata), White Shootingstar (Dodecatheon dentatum subsp. ellisiae), Ragleaf Bahia (Bahia dissecta), Canadian White Violet (Viola canadensis), Desert Zinnia (Zinnia acerosa), Cockerell Stonecrop (Sedum cockerellii), Virginia Strawberry (Fragaria virginiana subsp. glauca), Northern Bog Violet (Viola nephrophylla), Pygmy Bluet (Houstonia wrightii), Rusby Primrose (Primula rusbyi) and Desert Fluffgrass (Dasyochloa pulchella).

 

 

Township Notes

 

Location: This township is located in northeastern Pima County in south-central Arizona. The township is bounded on the north by the Pima/Pinal County Line. A portion of the community of Summerhaven, Butterfly Peak Natural Area and Pusch Ridge Wilderness Area are located within this township. This township is located within Coronado National Forest. Named historic mine communities and sites include the the Catalina Camp, and the Daily Mine Group, Geesaman Mine Group, Hartman Homestake Mines, Leatherwood Mine Group and Stratton Mine. Named historic ranch tanks and wells include the Dan Tank and Pidgeon Tank, and the Bat Well and Juanito Well.

 

Landmarks: This township is located on a portion of the eastern slopes of the Santa Catalina Mountains. Named peaks and saddles include Butterfly Peak, Inspiration Rock, Lombar Hill, Marble Peak, Oracle Ridge, Rice Peak and Syke Knob, and Dan Saddle and Stratton Saddle. Named basin canyons include Peck Basin, and Alder Canyon, Atchley Canyon, Cater Canyon, Edgar Canyon, Marshall Gulch and Stratton Canyon. Named springs include Alder Box Spring, Araster Spring, Big Alder Spring, Busch Spring, Coyote Spring, Crystal Spring, Doctor Spring, Eagle Spring, Geesaman Spring, Green Spring, Hartman Spring (Dry), Huntsman Spring (on the south (possibly south of) township line in Marshall Gulch), Juan Spring, Juanito Spring, Orchard Spring, Stratton Camp Spring and Upper Stratton Spring. Named washes include Geesaman Wash and Gibb Wash.

 

Elevation: Elevations range from approximately 3,940 feet at Alder Canyon on the east township line to approximately 8,277 feet at a peak about 1½ miles  north of the southwest corner (1).

 

Physiographic Province: This township is located within the Mexican Highland Section of the Basin and Range Physiographic Province (2).

 

Soil: Soils are described as thermic (hot) arid and semiarid soils (soils with mean annual temperatures of 59 degrees to 72 degrees Fahrenheit (15 degrees to 22 degrees Centigrade) and 10 to 16 inches (25 to 41 cm) mean annual precipitation) of the White House-Bernardino-Caralampi Association (deep, semiarid soils on uplands) and the Rock Outcrop-Lampshire-Cellar Association (rock outcrop and very shallow and shallow semiarid soils of the mountains and foothills); mesic (cool) subhumid soils (soils with mean annual soil temperatures of 47 degrees to 59 degrees Fahrenheit (8 degrees to 15 degrees Centigrade) and more than 16 inches (41 cm) mean annual precipitation) of the Rock Outcrop-Barkerville-Faraway Association (rock outcrop and very shallow and shallow subhumid soils of the mountains), and frigid (cold) subhumid soils (soils with mean annual soil temperatures of less than 47 degrees Fahrenheit (8 degrees Centigrade) and more than 16 inches (41 cm) mean annual precipitation) of the Mirabal-Rock Outcrop Association (very shallow to moderately deep soils and rock outcrop of the higher mountains) (3).

 

Biotic Community: Portions of this township are located within the Scrub-Grassland (Semidesert Grassland) Regional Formation of the Grassland Formation, Interior Chaparral of the Scrub Formation, Madrean Evergreen Woodland Regional Formation of the Woodland Formation, and Rocky Mountain (Petran) Montane Conifer Forest Regional Formation of the Forest Formation with associated Wetland Formations (4).

 

 

Maps created with TOPO! R C 2002 National Geographic

 

Map of Township Showing Adjacent Sections

 

 

The ARIZONA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY

http://aznps.org/

 

The ARIZONA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY is a statewide nonprofit organization devoted to Arizona's native plants. Its mission is to promote knowledge, appreciation, conservation, and restoration of Arizona native plants and their habitats. They work with the Southwest Rare Plant Task Force to develop strategies for protecting rare species and their habitats; they keep abreast of conservation issues concerning native plants species and responds to those through their Conservation Committee; they promote the use of native species in residential and commercial landscapes; they publish the Plant Press, support the publication of scholarly works and maintains a website with information and links about native plant, and they host a series of statewide events that provide forums to learn from professionals. Member activities and benefits include chapter and statewide gatherings; field trips and educational presentations; conservation through education, outreach and restoration; habitat restoration projects; informative website, newsletters and journals, and interactions with plant experts and enthusiasts.

 

Contact: Arizona Native Plant Society, PO Box 41206, Tucson, Arizona 85717.

 

 

The DESERT SURVIVORS NATIVE PLANT NURSERY

http://www.desertsurvivors.org/nursery.asp

 

The DESERT SURVIVORS NATIVE PLANT NURSERY sells many local native plants and is willing to consider growing any native plant for which there is a buyer.

 

Contact: Desert Survivors Native Plant Nursery, 1020 West Starr Pass Boulevard, Tucson, Arizona 85713, 520-791-9309.

 

 

The TUCSON CACTUS AND SUCCULENT SOCIETY

http://www.tucsoncactus.org/

 

The TUCSON CACTUS AND SUCCULENT SOCIETY is a non-profit organization dedicated to educating, teaching and learning about cacti and succulent plants. Their monthly programs feature knowledgeable individuals who can educate you and help you understand more about these fascinating plants. They conduct and sponsor native cactus and succulent rescue operations, plant sales, field trips, nursery and garden visits, conventions and conferences as well as other activities throughout the year. 

 

NATIVE PLANT RESCUE NOTICE

(The Tucson Cactus and Succulent Society puts a tremendous amount of time and effort  into the

organizing and overseeing of their rescue events. The native plant rescues carried out by the dedicated

members of the Society provide an immeasurable service to our community.)

 

The TUCSON CACTUS AND SUCCULENT SOCIETY organizes native plant rescues in areas being cleared for development. If interested in rescuing plants and/or obtaining local native plants for your landscaping or restoration project join the Society and become a rescue crew member.

 

Contact: Tucson Cactus and Succulent Society, PO Box 64759, Tucson, Arizona 85728-4759, 520-885-6367.

 

 

 

LISTING OF PLANTS

 

STRICTLY ENFORCED LAWS PROTECT MANY OF ARIZONA’S NATIVE  PLANTS FROM

COLLECTION, MUTILATION OR DESTRUCTION

 

 

Aceraceae: The Maple Family

 

Acer glabrum J. Torrey var. neomexicanum (E.L. Greene) Kearney & Peebles (5): Dwarf Maple, Mountain Maple, New Mexico Maple, Rocky Mountain Maple (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub or tree (to 33 feet high) (6); within range reported from high mountains, plateaus, canyons, slopes, at the base of cliffs, gulches and in moist soil along streams 7,000 to 9,000 feet elevation; the foliage is browsed by deer and elk; useful as an ornamental, leaves turn red in autumn)

 

Acer grandidentatum T. Nuttall: Bigtooth Maple, Canyon Maple, Western sugar Maple (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub or tree (to 50 feet high); within range reported from high mountains, plateaus, canyons, gulches, along streams 4,500 to 7,000 feet elevation; browsed by deer; leaves turning red or yellow in autumn, useful as an ornamental) 

 

Acer negundo C. Linnaeus: Arce, Ashleaf Maple, Ashleaved Maple, Boxelder, Fresno de Guajuco, Manitoba Maple (terrestrial perennial deciduous tree (30 to 60 feet high); within range reported from high mountains, plateaus, canyons, gulches, valleys, roadsides, waste places and moist and wet soils along streams 3,500 to 8,000 feet elevation; browsed by deer; useful as an ornamental)

 

Agavaceae: The Century-plant Family

 

Agave chrysantha R.H. Peebles: Agave, Apache Trail Agave, Golden-flowered Agave, Goldenflower Century Plant (terrestrial perennial evergreen succulent herb, subshrub or shrub (under 3 feet high with a flowering stem reaching to 23 feet in height); within range reported from canyons, rocky slopes, ridges, bajadas and outcrops 3,000 to 7,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Yucca baccata J. Torrey var. brevifolia (H.W. Schott ex J. Torrey) L. Benson & R.A. Darrow (Yucca arizonica S.A. McKelvey, Yucca thornberi S.A. McKelvey): Arizona Yucca, Banana Yucca, Datil, Palma Criolla, Spanish Dagger, Thornber Yucca (terrestrial perennial evergreen herb, subshrub or shrub (under 7 feet high with a flowering stalk reaching to 5 feet in height); within range reported from mesas, canyons, slopes, hills, bajadas, plains, gravelly flats, valleys and along washes and arroyos 3,000 to 5,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Yucca schottii G. Engelmann: Hairy Yucca, Hoary Yucca, Mountain Yucca, Schott’s Yucca, Spanish Bayonet, Spanish Dagger (terrestrial perennial narrow-leaved evergreen herb, shrub or tree (6 to 18 feet high with a flowering stalk reaching to 2 feet or more in height); within range reported from canyons, rocky slopes, woodlands, grasslands, hillsides, bajadas and valleys 4,000 to 7,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Anacardiaceae: The Sumac Family

 

Toxicodendron rydbergii (J.K. Small ex P.A. Rydberg) E.L. Greene (Rhus radicans C. Linnaeus (var. rydbergii (J.K. Small) A. Rehder is the variety reported from Arizona)): Hiedra, Mala, Poison Ivy, Poison-oak, Western Poison Ivy (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub (to 2 feet high, vine may reach a height of over 30 feet with trunk diameters of up to 12 inches); within range reported from mountains, canyons, slopes, ravines, stream banks, streambeds, bottomlands and disturbed areas 3,000 to 8,000 feet elevation; provides beautiful fall colors with the leaves turning yellow, orange and red; the plant’s oils cause painful swelling and skin eruptions, the milky juice is poisonous when taken internally; an applicable saying: “leaflets of three, let it be”; FIREFIGHTERS should exercise caution when working fires in areas where Poison Ivy is known to occur because the plant may not be recognizable and the smoke from the burning plant may carry with it a toxic substance (urushiol) that  can cause serious rashes inside of the nose, throat and lungs)

 

Apiaceae: The Carrot Family

(Umbelliferae: The Parsley Family)

 

Heracleum maximum W. Bartram (Heracleum lanatum A. Michaux): American Cow-parsnip, Common Cowparsnip, Cow-parsnip (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from moist soils 7,500 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Osmorhiza depauperata R.A. Philippi (Osmorhiza obtusa (T. Coulter & J.N. Rose) M.L. Fernald): Blunt-fruit Sweet-cicely, Bluntseed Sweetroot, Sweet Cicely, Sweet Root (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains and moist soil 7,000 to 10,000 feet elevation)

 

Pseudocymopterus montanus (A. Gray) T. Coulter & J.N. Rose: Alpine False Mountain-parsley, Alpine False Springparsley, Mountain Parsley (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains and gulches 5,500 to 12,000 feet elevation)

 

Asclepiadaceae: The Milkweed Family

 

Asclepias hypoleuca (A. Gray) R.E. Woodson: Mahogany Milkweed (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, slopes, ridges, roadways, along creeks and streams and disturbed areas 6,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Asteraceae: The Aster Family

(Compositae: The Sunflower Family)

 

Achillea millefolium C. Linnaeus var. occidentalis A.P. de Condolle (Achillea lanulosa T. Nuttall); Bloodwort, Carpenter’s Weed, Common Yarrow, Hierba de las Cortaduras, Milfoil, Plumajillo, Western Yarrow, Yarrow (terrestrial perennial herb (12 to 40 inches high); within range reported from mountains, slopes, hillsides, gulches, roadsides, waste ground and disturbed areas 5,500 to 11,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental, yarrow with lavender, pink and white flowers were observed in Marshall Gulch)

 

Ageratina rothrockii (A. Gray) G. King & H.E. Robbins (Eupatorium rothrockii A.Gray): Rothrock’s Snakeroot (terrestrial perennial herb or subshrub; within range reported from mountains, canyons, cliffs, slopes, gulches, among boulders, along washes, rocky places and moist soils along streams, drainages 6,500 to 8,000 feet elevation)

 

Agoseris aurantiaca (W.J. Hooker) E.L. Greene var. purpurea (A. Gray) A.J. Cronquist: Orange Agoseris, Orange-flower Goat-chicory, Orange Mountain-dandelion (terrestrial perennial herb, subshrub or shrub (to 2 feet high); within range reported from mountains, grassy slopes, meadows, basins, openings in pine forests, gulches and watersheds 5,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Antennaria marginata E.L. Greene: Whitemargin Pussytoes (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyon walls, below cliffs, rocky slopes, ravines, ridges, meadows, basins and along washes,  creeks and streams 5,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Artemisia ludoviciana T. Nuttall: Louisiana Cudweed Sagewort, Gray Sagewort, Louisiana Sagewort, Louisiana Wormwood, Mugwort Wormwood, Prairie Sage, Sagewort, White Sage, White Sagebrush (terrestrial perennial herb, subshrub or shrub (2 to 4 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons, rocky slopes, ridges, valleys, gulches, along washes and streambeds and fence rows 2,500 to 8,500 feet elevation; often on limestone)

 

Baccharis brachyphylla A. Gray: Shortleaf Baccharis, Short-leaved Baccharis (terrestrial perennial subshrub or shrub (to 2 feet high); within range reported from slopes, gravelly flats, washes, floodplains and streambeds 1,500 to 4,000 feet elevation)

 

Baccharis thesioides K.S. Kunth: Arizona Baccharis, Arizona False Willow, Mogollon Baccharis (terrestrial perennial subshrub or shrub; within range reported from mountains, canyons, and rocky slopes 4,000 to 8,000 feet elevation)

 

Bahia dissecta (A. Gray) N.L. Britton: Ragged-leaf False Goldfields, Ragleaf, Ragleaf Bahia, Yellow Ragweed (terrestrial annual, biennial or perennial herb (to 16 inches high); within range reported from mountains, openings in forests, canyons and rocky knolls 5,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Bidens tenuisecta A. Gray: Slimlobe Beggarticks (terrestrial annual herb; within range reported from mountains and canyons, 6,000 to 8,700 feet elevation)

 

Brickellia grandiflora (W.J. Hooker) T. Nuttall: Brickellia, Large-flowered Brickellbush, Large-flowered Thoroughwort, Mountain Brickellbush, Sheath Flower, Tasselflower Brickellbush, Tasselflower Brickellia (terrestrial perennial herb, subshrub or shrub (to 3 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons, cliffs, rocky slopes, banks, draws and roadsides 5,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Cirsium wheeleri (A. Gray) F. Petrak: Plume Thistle, Wheeler’s Thistle (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons, rocky slopes, meadows, flats, roadsides, lakesides and disturbed areas 5,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Erigeron arizonicus A. Gray (Erigeron rusbyi A. Gray): Arizona Fleabane (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, talus slopes, slopes, rocky outcrops, gulches, ravines, foothills, roadsides, meadows, along streams and moist soils  7,000 to 10,500 feet elevation)

 

Erigeron oreophilus J.M. Greenman: Chaparral Fleabane (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from canyon bottoms, cliffs, rocky ridges, slopes, rock crevices,  rock outcrops, among rocks and boulders, sandy benches, along streams and disturbed areas 4,500 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Galinsoga parviflora A.J. Cavanilles (Galinsoga semicalva (A. Gray) H. St. John & D. White): Gallant-soldier, Quickweed (terrestrial annual herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons and canyon bottoms, slopes, meadows, flats, soil pockets on rock outcrops, along creeks and streams and wet soils 5,500 to 8,200 feet elevation. Exotic?)

 

Hieracium lemmonii A. Gray: Lemmon’s Hawkweed (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains 7,000 to 8,000 feet elevation)

 

Hymenoxys hoopesii (A. Gray) M.W. Bierner (Helenium hoopesii A. Gray): Orange Sneeze-weed, Owl’s-claws (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, meadows and wet soils 7,000 to 11,000 feet elevation)

 

Laennecia schiedeana (C.F. Lessing) G.L. Nesom (Conyza schiedeana (C.F. Lessing) A.J. Cronquist, Erigeron schiedeanus C.F. Lessing): Gordolobo, Pineland Marshtail, Simonillo, Xurhatajasi (terrestrial long lived annual herb; within range reported from flats, washes and disturbed areas (2,400?)  7,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Pseudognaphalium macounii (E.L. Greene) J.T. Kartesz comb. nov. ined. (Gnaphalium macounii E.L. Greene): Macoun’s Cudweed (terrestrial annual or biennial herb; within range reported from mountains 5,500 to 10,000 feet elevation)

 

Senecio bigelovii A. Gray: Bigelow Groundsel, Nodding Groundsel, Nodding Ragwort (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, hillsides, clearings in forests, meadows, roadsides seeps, springs and mist and damp soils 7,000 to 11,000 feet elevation)

 

Senecio eremophilus A.J. Richards var. macdougalii (F.X. Heller) A.J. Cronquist (Senecio macdougalii F.X. Heller): Desert Ragwort, Groundsel, MacDougal’s Ragwort (terrestrial perennial herb, subshrub or shrub (to 3 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons and forests 6,500 to 10,500 feet elevation)

 

Senecio wootoni E.L. Greene: Wooton’s Ragwort, Wootn’s Butterweed (terrestrial perennial herb, subshrub or shrub (to 2 feet high); within range reported from mountains, slopes, forests and flats 6,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Solidago wrightii A. Gray var. adenophora A. Blake: Wright’s Goldenrod (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains and forests 3,500 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Viguiera cordifolia A. Gray: Heartleaf Goldeneye (trerrestrial perennial subshrub or shrub; within range reported from mountains, canyons, rocky slopes, forests, plains and dry soils 3,500 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Sonchus oleraceus C. Linnaeus: Achicoria Dulce, Annual Sowthistle, Cerraja, Colewort, Common Sowthistle, Grespino Commune, Hare’s Lettuce, Kaalivalvatti, Milk Thistle, Smooth Sowthistle, Sowthistle (terrestrial long lived annual herb; within range reported from rocky slopes, gravelly flats, roadsides, along washes, floodplains, moist ground and disturbed areas 150 to 7,000 feet elevation. EXOTIC Invasive Plant)

 

Zinnia acerosa (A.P. de Condolle) A. Gray (Zinnia pumila A. Gray): Desert Zinnia, Spinyleaf Zinnia, White Zinnia, Wild Zinnia (terrestrial perennial subshrub or shrub (under 1 foot high); within range reported from mesas, rocky slopes, gravelly bajadas, gravelly flats and floodplains 2,500 to 5,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Berberidaceae: The Barberry Family

 

Berberis wilcoxii T.H. Kearney: Holly Leaf Grape, Wilcox’s Barberry, Wilcox Hollygrape (terrestrial perennial evergreen shrub (to7 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons, moist sandy soil on slopes, hillsides, springs and along creeks and streams 5,500 to 8,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental, flowers are reportedly fragrant)

 

Betulaceae: The Birch Family

 

Alnus oblongifolia J. Torrey: Arizona Alder, Mexican Alder, New Mexican Alder (terrestrial perennial deciduous tree (60 to 80 feet high); within range reported from wet soils in rocky canyon bottoms and along streams in mountains 5,000 to 7,500 feet elevation; useful in checking erosion along watercourses)

 

Boraginaceae: The Borage Family

 

Lithospermum multiflorum J. Torrey ex A. Gray: Manyflower Gromwell, Manyflower Puccoon, Manyflowered Stoneseed, Purple Gromwell (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, gravelly slopes, benches and flats 6,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Brassicaceae (Cruciferae): The Mustard Family

 

Draba helleriana E.L. Greene: Heller’s Draba, Heller Whitlow-grass (terrestrial biennial or perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons, rocky crests, rocky points, rock faces; rocky slopes, among boulders and along streams 6,000 to 11,500 feet elevation)

 

Draba helleriana E.L. Greene var. bifurcata C.L. Hitchcock: Heller’s Draba, Heller Whitlow-grass (terrestrial biennial or perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, slopes, gulches, meadows, springs and along streams 6,000 to 11,500 feet elevation)

 

Draba petrophila E.L. Greene: Santa Rita Mountain Draba, Santa Rita Mountain Whitlowgrass, Santa Rita Whitlow Grass (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, rocky cliffs, rocky points, rock outcrops, crevices in rocks and boulders, slopes and among rocks 4,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Cactaceae: The Cactus Family

 

Opuntia engelmannii J.F. Salm-Reifferscheid-Dyck var. engelmannii (Opuntia phaeacantha G. Engelmann var. discata (D. Griffiths) L. Benson & D.L. Walkington): Abrojo, Cactus Apple, Desert Pricklypear Cactus, Engelmann Pricklypear, Flaming Pricklypear, Joconostle, Nopal, Prickly Pear, Vela de Coyote (terrestrial perennial succulent subshrub or shrub (to 4 feet high); within range reported from canyon bottoms, rocky slopes, ridges, bajadas, slopes, benches, rocky and gravelly flats, valleys, and along washes, gullies and arroyos 1,000 to 6,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; provides cover for many desert animals)

 

Opuntia phaeacantha G. Engelmann var. major G. Engelmann: Abrojo, Joconostle, Major Pricklypear, Mojave Pricklypear, Nopal, Sprawling Prickly Pear, Vela de Coyote, Yellow Pricklypear (terrestrial perennial succulent subshrub or shrub (to 5 feet high); within range reported from rocky slopes, hills, bajadas, flats and valleys in sandy, gravelly or rocky soils 1,000 to 7,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; provides cover for many desert animals)

 

 

Sclerocactus erectocentrus (T. Coulter) N.P. Taylor: Redspine Fishhook Cactus (terrestrial perennial succulent subshrub or shrub (under 1 foot high); within range reported from hills, bajadas, slopes and flats 1,000 to 4,500 feet elevation; includes Echinomastus erectocentrus (T. Coulter) N.L. Britton & J.N. Rose var. acunensis (W.T. Marshall) L. Benson (Neolloydia erectocentra (T. Coulter) L. Benson var. acunensis (W.T. Marshall) L. Benson): Acuna Cactus, Bisnagitas, Red-spined Pineapple Cactus (terrestrial perennial succulent subshrub or shrub (under 6 inches high); within range reported from ridges and bajadas 1,200 to 2,300 feet elevation) and Echinomastus erectocentrus (T. Coulter) N.L. Britton & J.N. Rose var. erectocentrus (Neolloydia erectocentra (T. Coulter) L. Benson var. erectocentra: Bisnagitas, Needle-spined Pineapple Cactus, Redspine Fishhook Cactus (terrestrial perennial succulent subshrub or shrub (under 1 foot high); within range reported from hills, bajadas, slopes and flats 1,000 to 4,500 feet elevation). PERIPHERAL PLANT(S))

 

Campanulaceae: The Bellflower Family

 

Lobelia anatina F. Wimmer: Apache Lobelia, Mountain Lobelia, Southwestern Blue Lobelia (terrestrial perennial herb (to 18 inches high); within range reported from mountains, meadows, seeps, springs, stream banks, marshes and wet soils 5,500 to 9,000 feet elevation; attracts bees and hummingbirds; useful as an ornamental)

 

Triodanis perfoliata (C. Linnaeus) J.A. Nieuwland: Clasping-leaf Venus’-looking-glass, Clasping Venus’ Looking-glass, Venus Looking Glass (terrestrial annual herb; within range reported from mountains, rocky banks, woodlands, plains, streambeds, moist soils and disturbed areas below 7,000 feet elevation)

 

Caprifoliaceae: The Honeysuckle Family

 

Lonicera arizonica A. Rehder: Arizona Honeysuckle (terrestrial perennial vine or shrub; within range reported from mountains, canyons, open coniferous forests, slopes, gulches, basins, springs, creeks and rivers 6,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Sambucus racemosa C. Linnaeus var. melanocarpa (A. Gray) H.E. McMinn (Sambucus melanocarpa A. Gray): Blackbead Elder, Black Elderberry, European Red Elder (terrestrial subshrub, shrub or tree (to 10 feet high); within range reported from mountains and forests 7,500 to 10,000 feet elevation; fruits and other plants parts are reportedly poisonous; foliage is browsed by deer, fruits are eaten by birds)

 

Sambucus nigra C. Linnaeus subsp. canadensis (C. Linnaeus) R. Bolli (Sambucus mexicana C.B. Presl ex A.P. de Condolle): American Elderberry, Arizona Blue Elder, Blueberry Elder, Arizona Elder, Common Elderberry, Desert Elderberry, Elder, Elderberry, Mexican Elder, Mexican Elderberry, Sauco, Tapiro, Tapiro Sauco (terrestrial perennial deciduous subshrub, shrub or tree (to 36 feet high); within range reported from washes, floodplains, creeks, streams, watercourses, ditches, cienegas and wet areas 1,000 to 4,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; foliage is browsed by deer, fruits are eaten by birds)

 

Caryophyllaceae: The Pink Family

 

Arenaria lanuginosa (A. Michaux) P. Rohrbach subsp. saxosa (A. Gray) B. Maguire: Sandwort, Spreading Sandwort (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons, roadsides, springs, gulches and disturbed areas 7,000 to 12,000 feet elevation)

 

Drymaria effusa A. Gray: Pinewoods Drymary (terrestrial annual herb; within range reported from mountains, canyon bottoms, rocky outcrops, among rocks and bogs 6,000 to 7,500 feet elevation)

 

Silene scouleri W.J. Hooker (subsp. pringlei (S. Watson) C.L. Hitchcock & B. Maguire is the subspecies reported as occurring in Arizona, Silene pringlei S. Watson): Scouler’s Catchfly, Simple Campion, Simple Catchfly (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, slopes, forests and meadows 5,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Chenopodiaceae: The Goosefoot Family

 

Chenopodium fremontii S. Watson: Fremont’s Goosefoot (terrestrial long lived annual herb; within range reported from rocky slopes, openings in forests, ravines, gravelly flats and floodplains 2,500 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Chenopodium graveolens C.L. von Wildenow (Chenopodium incisum J.L. Poiret): Fetid Goosefoot, Ragleaf Goosefoot (terrestrial annual herb; within range reported from mountains, plateaus, canyons, sandy terraces,  slopes, ridges and among rocks, 5,000 to 9,000 feet elevation; turns bright red in autumn providing fall color)

 

Clusiaceae (Guttiferae): The St. John’s-wort Family

 

Hypericum scouleri W.J. Hooker subsp. scouleri (Hypericum formosum K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth):  Scouler’s St. John’s-wort, Southwestern St. John’s-wort (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, meadows, springs, along streams and moist and wet soils 5,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Commelinaceae: The Spiderwort Family

 

Commelina dianthifolia A.R. Delile: Birdbill Dayflower (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, mesas, canyons, slopes, ridge tops, among rocks and boulders, rocky hillsides, meadows and along streams 3,500 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Convolvulaceae: The Morning-glory Family

 

Ipomoea plummerae A. Gray: Huachuca Mountain Morning-glory (terrestrial perennial herb or vine; within range reported from mountains and rocky flats 5,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Cornaceae: The Dogwood Family

 

Cornus sericea C. Linnaeus subsp. sericea (Cornus stolonifera A. Michaux): Redosier, Redosier Dogwood (terrestrial perennial shrub or tree (to 8 feet high); within range reported from along streams 2,500 to 9,000 feet elevation; fruits are attractive to birds; useful as an ornamental)

 

Crassulaceae: The Stonecrop Family

 

Sedum cockerellii N.L. Britton: Cockerell Sedum, Cockerell’s Stonecrop (terrestrial perennial succulent herb (to 8 inches high); within range reported from rocks and rocky areas 5,000 to 11,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Cyperaceae: The Sedge Family

 

Carex occidentalis D.K. Bailey: Oklahoma Sedge, Western Sedge (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons, slopes, rock outcrops, meadows, springs, muddy soil, gulches, creeks, sandy streambeds, waterfalls, cienegas, tanks, lakes  6,500 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Carex subfusca W. Boott: Brown Sedge (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, springs, seeps, creeks, streams, cienegas, edges of pools, tanks and lakes and moist and wet soils 3,500 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Carex vallicola C. Dewey (var. rusbyi (K.K. MacKenzie) F.J. Hermann. is the variety of Carex vallicola reported from Arizona) (Carex rusbyi Mackenzie): Rusby Sedge, Valley Sedge (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons, deep shade on dry slopes, gravelly slopes among boulders, springs, moist soil along creeks, along streams and stream beds and shorelines of lakes 7,000 to 9,500 feet elevation) 

 

Cyperus fendlerianus J.O. Boeckeler: Fendler’s Faltsedge, Fendler Nutgrass, Tuberroot Flatsedge (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons, slopes, ridge tops, gravelly ridges, among rocks, meadows, springs, creeks and creek terraces, along streams and shallow depressions 4,500 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Dennstaedtaceae: The Bracken Fern Family

 

Pteridium aquilinum (C. Linnaeus) F.A. Kuhn (var. pubescens L.M. Underwood is the variety reported as occurring in Arizona): Bracken, Brake, Downy Bracken-fern, Hairy Brackenfern, Pasture Brake, Western Bracken, Western Bracken-fern (terrestrial perennial herb (to 4 feet high); within range reported from mountains, slopes, forests and woodlands, meadows, flats and dry and moist soils 5,000 to 8,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental, a post-fire successional plant)

 

Dryopteridaceae: The Wood Fern Family

 

Athyrium filix-femina (C. Linnaeus) A.W. Roth subsp. cyclosorum (F.J. Ruprecht) C.F. Christensen (Athyrium filix-femina (C. Linnaeus) A.W. Roth,  var. californicum Butters is the variety reported as occurring in Arizona): Lady Fern, Subarctic Ladyfern (terrestrial perennial herb (to 3 feet high); within range reported from shaded areas cracks in boulders, around springs and along streams 7,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Equisetaceae: The Horsetail Family

 

Equisetum hyemale C. Linnaeus: Common Scouring Rush, Horsetail, Scouring Horsetail, Scouring Rush, Scouringrush Horsetail, Tall Scouring Rush Western Scouringrush (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons, slopes, hillsides, gulches, ravines, meadows, springs, along creeks and streams, moist soils and wet sandy soils and lakes 5,000 to 8,000 feet elevation)

 

Equisetum laevigatum A.K. Braun: Braun Scouringrush, Horsetail, Kansas Horsetail, Kansas Scouringrush, Smooth Horsetail, Smooth Scouringrush, Summer Scouringrush (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons, meadows, valleys, springs, creekbeds, streambeds and riverbeds, along streams and rivers, marshes and moist  and wet soils 5,000 to 8,000 feet elevation)

 

Fabaceae (Leguminosae): The Pea Family

 

Acacia constricta G. Bentham: Chaparro Prieto, Common Whitethorn, Garabato, Gigantillo, Huisache, Largoncillo, Mescat Acacia, Vara Prieta, Vinorama, Whitethorn Acacia, White Thorn (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub or tree (to 10 feet high); within range reported from mesas, canyons, rocky slopes, ridges, gravelly bajadas, gravelly flats, floodplains and along washes and arroyos 2,500 to 5,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental, the flowers are fragrant)

 

Calliandra eriophylla G. Bentham var. eriophylla: Cabelleto de Angel, Cabeza Angel, Fairyduster, False Mesquite, False Mesquite Calliandra, Guajillo, Hairy-leaved Calliandra, Huajillo, Mesquitilla (terrestrial perennial deciduous subshrub or shrub (to 3 feet high); within range reported from mesas, canyons, rocky slopes, gravelly bajadas, gravelly flats and along washes below 5,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; browsed by wildlife.)

 

Cologania angustifolia K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth (Cologania longifolia A. Gray): Longleaf Cologania (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons, rocky slopes and spurs and draws 4,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Dalea polygonoides A. Gray: Sixweeks Dalea, Sixweeks Prairie Clover (terrestrial annual herb; within range reported from mountains, slopes, ridges, soil pockets on rock outcrops, knolls, gulches, meadows, flats and roadsides 5,500 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Desmodium arizonicum S. Watson: Arizona Ticktrefoil, Beggar-ticks (terrestrial annual herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons, divides, slopes, hillsides and gulches 4,000 to 8,000 feet elevation)

 

Lathyrus lanszwertii A. Kellogg var. leucanthus (P.A. Rydberg) R.D. Dorn (Lathyrus arizonicus N.L. Britton): Arizona Pea, Arizona Peavine, Arizona Sweet Pea, Nevada Pea, Nevada Vetchling, Wild Sweet Pea (terrestrial perennial herb or vine; within range reported from mountains )

 

Lathyrus graminifolius (S. Watson) J. White: Grassleaf Pea, Grassleaf Pea Vine, Grassleaf Vetchling (terrestrial herbaceous vine; within range reported from mountains, shaded slopes and gulches 4,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Lotus plebeius (A. Brand) R.C. Barneby (Lotus oroboides (K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth) A.M. Ottley): New Mexico Bird’s-foot Trefoil (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains and gravelly slopes 5,000 to 8,000 feet elevation)

 

Lupinus palmeri S. Watson: Bluebonnet Lupine, Palmer Lupine (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, gravelly slopes and flats 4,000 to 8,000 feet elevation)

 

Phaseolus grayanus (E.O. Wooten) P.C. Standley: Gray’s Bean, Gray Limabean (terrestrial annual or perennial herb or vine; within range reported from mountains, canyons, rocky slopes, clearings in forests and gulches 5,000 to 8,500 feet elevation)

 

Prosopis velutina E.O. Wooton (Prosopis juliflora (O. Swartz) A.P. de Condolle var. velutina (E.O. Wooton) C.S. Sargent): Algarroba, Chachaca, Mesquite, Mezquite, Velvet Mesquite (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub or tree (20 to 50 feet high); within range reported from mesas, canyons, bajadas, slopes, gravelly flats, roadsides, along washes and streams and floodplains below 6,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; provides food and shelter for many species of wildlife)

 

Robinia neomexicana A. Gray: New Mexican Locust, New Mexico Locust, Southwestern Locust (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub or tree (to 25 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons, slopes, floodplains and waste places 4,000 to 8,500 feet elevation; of special value in reducing erosion, useful as an ornamental, flowers are large, showy and fragrant; bark, roots and seeds are reported to be poisonous; the foliage is browsed by wildlife)

 

Trifolium pinetorum E.L. Greene: Pinewoods Clover, Woods Clover (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, forests, meadows, seeps, springs, streambanks and damp and moist soils 6,500 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Trifolium repens C. Linnaeus: White Clover, White Lawn CLover (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, meadows, roadsides and disturbed areas. EXOTIC Invasive Plant)

 

Vicia pulchella K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth: Showy Vetch, Sweetclover Vetch (terrestrial perennial herb or vine; within range reported from mountains and forests 6,000 to 8,500 feet elevation)

 

Fagaceae: The Beech Family

 

Quercus gambelii T. Nuttall var. gambelii: Gambel Oak, Rocky Mountain White Oak, Utah White Oak (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub or tree (7 to 70 feet high); within range reported from mountains, plateaus, canyon bottoms, slopes, foothills and valleys 5,000 to 8,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; leaves are browsed by deer, the acorns are eaten by wildlife)

 

Quercus hypoleucoides A. Camus: Silverleaf Oak, Whiteleaf Oak (terrestrial perennial evergreen shrub or tree (30 to 65 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons, woodlands, and slopes 5,000 to 8,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Fouquieriaceae: The Ocotillo Family

 

Fouquieria splendens G. Engelmann: Albarda, Barda, Candle Bush, Candle Wood, Coach Whip, Flamingsword, Jacob’s Staff, Monkey-tail, Ocotillo, Ocotillo del Corral, Slimwood, Vine Cactus (terrestrial perennial shrub (7 to 33 feet high); within range reported from mesas, rocky slopes, hills, bajadas, plains and gravelly flats below 6,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; a preferred food plant of Costa’s Hummingbird)

 

Geraniaceae: The Geranium Family

 

Geranium caespitosum T.P. James: Cranesbill, James Geranium, Patita de Leon, Pinewoods Geranium, Purple Cluster Crane’s-bill, Purple Geranium, Tufted Geranium, Wild Geranium (perennial herb or subshrub; within range reported from mountains, rocky slopes and along streambeds 5,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Geranium caespitosum T.P. James var. fremontii (J. Torrey & A. Gray) R.D. Dorn (Geranium fremontii J. Torrey & A. Gray): Fremont’s Geranium (terrestrial perennial herb or subshrub; within range reported from mountains 5,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Geranium richardsonii F.E. von Fischer & E.R. von Trautvetter: Cranesbill, Richardson’s Geranium, White Crane’s-bill, White Geranium (terrestrial perennial herb (to 18 inches high; within range reported from mountains, shaded slopes and gulches 6,500 to 11,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Hydrangeaceae: The Hydrangea Family

 

Jamesia americana J. Torrey & A Gray: Fivepetal Cliffbush (terrestrial perennial shrub (to 7 feet in height); within range reported from mountains, walls of canyons and along streams 7,500 to 9,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Juncaceae: The Rush Family

 

Juncus saximontanus A. Nelson (forma brunnescens (P.A. Rydberg) Hermann): Rocky Mountain Rush (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, moist meadows and wet soils 4,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Luzula bulbosa (W. Wood) B.B. Smyth & B.B. Smyth (Luzula campestris (C. Linnaeus) A.P. de Condolle): Bulb Woodrush, Bulbous Woodrush (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains)

 

Krameriaceae: The Ratany Family

 

Krameria erecta C.L. von Wildenow (Krameria parviflora G. Bentham): Chacate, Coashui, Littleleaf Ratany, Pima Ratany, Purple Heather, Range Ratany, Small-flower Ratany (terrestrial perennial subshrub or shrub (under 2 feet high); within range reported from mesas, rocky and gravelly slopes, gravelly bajadas, plains and gravelly flats below 5,000 feet)

 

Lamiaceae (Labiatae): The Mint Family

 

Clinopodium vulgare C. Linnaeus (Satureja vulgaris (C. Linnaeus) K. Fritsch): Wild Basil (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains 6,000 to 7,500 feet elevation)

 

Hedeoma dentata J. Torrey: Dentate False Pennyroyal, Mock-pennyroyal (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from gravelly slopes 4,000 to 7,500 feet elevation)

 

Prunella vulgaris C. Linnaeus: Carpenterweed, Common Selfheal, Heal-all (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, meadows, roadsides, along streams, lake shores and moist soils 5,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Liliaceae: The Lily Family

 

Maianthemum racemosum (C. Linnaeus) J.H. Link subsp. racemosum (Smilacina racemosa (C. Linnaeus) R.L. Desfontaines): Branched Solomon’s-Seal, Feathery False Lily of the Valley, False Solomon’s Seal, Feather Solomon-plume, Treacleberry, Wild Spikenard (terrestrial perennial herb (1 to 3 feet high); within range reported from mountains, slopes, forests and moist soils 6,000 to 10,000 feet elevation)

 

Maianthemum stellata (C. Linnaeus) J.H. Link (Smilacina stellata (C. Linnaeus) R.L. Desfontaines): Starflower, Starry False Lily of the Valley, Star Solomon’s-plume, Star Solomon’s Seal (terrestrial perennial herb (to 2 feet high); within range reported from mountains, slopes, forests and along watercourses 7,500 to 10,000 feet elevation)

 

Nyctaginaceae: The Four-o’clock Family

 

Allionia incarnata C. Linnaeus: Guapile, Herba de la Hormiga, Pink Three-flower, Trailing Allionia, Trailing Four O’Clock, Trailing Windmills, Umbrella Wort, Windmills (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from rocky slopes, gravelly flats, along washes and disturbed sites below 6,000 feet elevation)

 

Mirabilis albida (T. Walter) A. Heimerl: White Four O’clock (terrestrial perennial herb or subshrub; within range reported from mountains)

 

Onagraceae: The Evening-primrose Family

 

Epilobium ciliatum C.S. Rafinesque subsp. ciliatum (Epilobium adenocaulon H.C. Haussknecht): Fringed Wiloowherb, Hairy Willowherb, Hairy Willoweed, Transpecos Willowherb (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, meadows, flats, seeps, springs, along creeks and streams, cienegas and wet soils 4,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Oenothera elata K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth subsp. hirsutissima (A. Gray ex S Watson) W. Dietrich: (Oenothera hookeri J. Torrey & A. Gray subsp. hewettii T.D. Cockerell,  Oenothera hookeri J. Torrey & A. Gray subsp. hirsutissima (A. Gray ex S Watson) P.A. Munz): Hooker’s Evening Primrose, Yellow Flowered Evening-primrose (terrestrial biennial or perennial herb (to 4 feet high); within range reported from damp places in mountains, slopes, clearings in forests and woodlands, plains, roadsides, springs, streambeds and pools 3,500 to 9,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Oenothera mexicana E. Spach: Mexican Evening-primrose (terrestrial annual, biennial or perennial herb; within range reported from mountains)

 

Orchidaceae: The Orchid Family

 

Corallorrhiza maculata (C.S. Rafinesque) C.S. Rafinesque var maculata: Large Coralroot, Spotted Coralroot, Summer Coralroot (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons, slopes, gulches, ravines, draws, meadows and springs 6,000 to 10,000 feet elevation)

 

Corallorrhiza wisteriana C.W. Conrad: Coralroot, Spring Coralroot, Wister Coralroot (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, slopes, hillsides and clearings 6,000 to 8,000 feet elevation)

 

Listera convallarioides (O. Swartz) T. Nuttall ex S. Elliott: Broadleaf Twayblade, Broadlipped Twayblade (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains 8,000 feet elevation)

 

Malaxis tenuis (S. Watson) O. Ames: Arizona Adder’s-mouth Orchid, Slender Adders Mouth (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains 7,000 feet elevation)

 

Platanthera limosa J. Lindley (Habenaria limosa (J. Lindley) W.B. Hemsley: Thurber’s Bog Orchid (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains 7,000 to 8,000 feet elevation)

 

Oxalidaceae: The Wood-sorrel Family

 

Oxalis alpina (J.N. Rose) J.N. Rose ex K.S. Kunth (Oxalis metcalfei (J.K. Small) K.S. Kunth: Alpine Woodsorrel, Mountain Wood Sorrel (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, forests and among rocks 5,500 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Pineaceae: The Pine Family

 

Abies concolor (G. Gordon & R. Glendinning) J. Lindley ex F.H. Hildebrand: Balsam Fir, Concolor Fir, Silver Fir, White Balsam, White Fir (terrestrial perennial evergreen tree (to 150 feet high): within range reported from high mountains, in moist and rocky soils and on steep shaded slopes 5,500 to 10,000 feet elevation; porcupines gnaw on the bark, deer and grouse feed on the foliage, the seeds are eaten by birds and mammals; useful as an ornamental)

 

Picea engelmannii C.C. Parry ex G. Engelmann: Engelmann Spruce; Mountain Spruce, Silver Spruce, White Spruce (terrestrial perennial evergreen tree (to 100 feet high); within range reported from mountains 8,000 to 12,000 feet elevation; reported from, but not recently observed in the Santa Catalina Mountains; useful as an ornamental)

 

Pinus arizonica G. Engelmann var. arizonica (Pinus ponderosa P. & C. Lawson var. arizonica (G. Engelmann) G.R. Shaw): Arizona Pine, Arizona Ponderosa Pine, Arizona Yellow Pine Ponderosa Pine Yellow Pine, Western Yellow Pine, Yellow Pine (terrestrial perennial evergreen tree (80 to 150 feet high); within range reported from high mountains, canyons, slopes and ridges 3,500 to 9,500 feet elevation; the seeds are eaten by wildlife; useful as an ornamental)

 

Pinus ponderosa P. & C. Lawson var. scopulorum G. Engelmann: Blackjack Pine, Interior Ponderosa Pine, Ponderosa Pine, Rocky Mountain Ponderosa Pine, Western Yellow Pine, Yellow Pine (terrestrial perennial evergreen tree (80 to 150 feet high); within range reported from high mountains, canyons, slopes and ridges 3,500 to 9,500 feet elevation; the seeds are eaten by wildlife; useful as an ornamental)

 

Pinus strobiformis G. Engelmann (Pinus reflexa (G. Engelman) G. Engelmann: Border Limber Pine, Border White Pine, Mexican White Pine, Pino Enana, Rocky Mountain White Pine, Southwestern White Pine, White Pine (terrestrial perennial evergreen tree (60 to 100 feet high); within range reported from high mountains, canyons, slopes and ridges 6,500 to 10,000 feet elevation; the seeds are eaten by wildlife; useful as an ornamental)

 

Pseudotsuga menziesii (C.F. de Mirbel) J.F. do Amaral Franco var. glauca (Pseudotsuga taxifolia var. glauca (L. Beissner) G.B. Sudworth): Blue Douglas-fir, Common Douglas-fir, Douglas-fir, Douglas Spruce, Oregon Pine, Red Fir, Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir, Yellow Fir (terrestrial perennial evergreen tree (to 190 feet high); within range reported from high mountains, canyons, north facing slopes and ravines 5,000 to 10,000 feet elevation; foliage is browsed by deer, elk and grouse, birds and mammals eat the seeds; useful as an ornamental)

 

Poaceae (Gramineae): The Grass Family

 

Aristida schiedeana C.B. von Trinius & F.J. Ruprecht var. orcuttiana (G. Vasey) K.W. Allred & J. Valdés-Reyna (Aristida laxa A.J. Cavanilles, Aristida orcuttiana G. Vasey): Beggartick Grass, Orcutt’s Threeawn, Singleawn Aristida (terrestrial perennial herb (12 to 40 inches tall); within range reported from mountains, canyon bottoms, slopes, among boulders, draws, roadsides and disturbed areas 4,000 to 7,000 feet elevation)

 

Dasyochloa pulchella (K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth) C.L. von Wildenow x P.A. Rydberg (Erioneuron pulchellum (K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth) T. Tateoka, Tridens pulchellus (K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth) A.S. Hitchcock): Desert Fluffgrass, Fluffgrass, Low Woollygrass, Zacate Borreguero (terrestrial perennial herb (3 to 6 inches tall); within range reported from mesas, rocky slopes, rocky hills, gravelly bajadas and gravelly flats below 5,500 feet elevation)

 

Deschampsia elongata (W.J. Hooker) W. Munro: Slender Hairgrass (terrestrial perennial herb (12 to 40 inches tall); within range reported from mountains, slopes, hillsides, meadows, open ground, seeps, streambeds and along washes and streams 4,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Festuca sororia C.V. Piper: Ravine Fescue (terrestrial perennial herb (16 to 40 inches tall); within range reported from mountains, canyons, slopes, hillsides, roadsides, stream banks, cienegas and moist soils 7,500 to 11,000 feet elevation)

 

Glyceria striata (J.B. de Lamarck) A.S. Hitchcock (Glyceria elata (G.V. Nash & P.A. Rydberg) M.E. Jones): Fowl Mannagrass, Nerved Managrass, Tall Mannagrass (aquatic perennial herb (12 to 40 inches tall); within range reported from mountains, canyons, wet meadows, marshy places and moist soils 5,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Muhlenbergia longiligula A.S. Hitchcock: Longtongue Muhly (terrestrial perennial herb (8 to 16 inches tall); within range reported from mountains, canyons, rocky slopes, ledges and streambeds 5,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Muhlenbergia virescens (K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth) K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth (Muhlenbergia straminea A.S. Hitchcock): Screwleaf Muhly (terrestrial perennial herb (10 to 24 inches tall); within range reported from mountains, mesas, rocky slopes, ridges and rocky hills, grows in extensive stands on forest floors where there is low light intensity 5,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Panicum bulbosum K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth: Bulb Panicgrass, Bulb Panicum (terrestrial perennial herb (20 to 48 inches tall); within range reported from mountains, rocky canyons, slopes, forests, hills, woodlands, streambeds and moist soils 4,500 to 8,000 feet elevation)

 

Poa palustris C. Linnaeus: Fowl Bluegrass (terrestrial perennial herb (14 to 40 inches tall); within range reported from mountains, meadows and moist soils at low and medium altitudes)

 

Schizachyrium sanguineum (A.J. Retzius) A.H. Alston var. hirtiflorum (C.G. Nees von Esenbeck) E.D. Hatch) (Andropogon hirtiflorus (C.G. Nees von Esenbeck) K.S. Kunth var. feensis (E.P. Fournier) E. Hackel, Schizachyrium hirtiflorum C.G. Nees von Esenbeck):  Crimson Bluestem, Crimson False Bluestem (terrestrial perennial herb (12 to 32 inches tall); within range reported from mountains, canyons and rocky slopes and openings in forests and woodlands 4,000 to 7,500 feet elevation)

 

Polemoniaceae: The Phlox Family

 

Ipomopsis aggregata (F.T. Pursh) V.E. Grant subsp. aggregata (Gilia aggregata (F.T. Pursh) C.P. Sprengel): Desert Trumpets, Foxfire, Hummingbird Flower, Pink Gilia, Polecat Plant, Scarlet Gilia, Skunk Flower, Skyrocket, Trumpet Phlox (terrestrial biennial or perennial herb (to 3 feet high); within range reported from mountains, slopes and roadsides 5,000 to 8,500 feet elevation; browsed by deer and Pronghorn Antelope, the flowers attract hummingbirds; useful as an ornamental) 

 

Ipomopsis tenuituba (P.A. Rydberg) V.E. Grant (Ipomopsis aggregata (F.T. Pursh) V.E. Grant var. macrosiphon T.H. Kearney & R.H. Peebles): Slendertube Skyrocket (terrestrial perennial herb, subshrub or shrub (6 to 84? inches high); within range reported from mountains 5,000 to 8,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; browsed by deer and Pronghorn Antelope, the flowers attract hummingbirds)

 

Polygonaceae: The Buckwheat Family

 

Rumex sp.: Dock

 

Primulaceae: The Primrose Family

 

Dodecatheon dentatum W.J. Hooker subsp. ellisiae (P.C. Standley) H.J. Thompson (Dodecatheon ellisiae P.C. Standley): Ellis Shootingstar, White Shootingstar (terrestrial perennial herb (6 to 16 inches high); within range reported from mountains, rocky slopes, hillsides, meadows, flats, seeps, springs, along creeks and streams, swamps 8,000 to 9,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Primula rusbyi E.L. Greene: Rusby’s Primrose (terrestrial perennial herb (flower stalk to about 10 inches); within range reported from mountains, slopes and damp ledges 7,500 to 10,500 feet elevation)

 

Ranunculaceae: The Buttercup Family

 

Aquilegia chrysantha A. Gray: Golden Columbine, Yellow Columbine (terrestrial perennial herb (to 4 feet high0; within range reported from mountains, forests, seeps, along streams and rich and moist soils 3,000 to 11,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Thalictrum dasycarpum F.E. von Fischer & J.L. Avé-Lallemant: Purple Meadow-rue (terrestrial perennial herb (to 3 feet high); within range reported from mountains at about 6,000 feet elevation)

 

Thalictrum fendleri G. Engelmann ex A. Gray: Fendler’s Meadow-rue (terrestrial perennial herb (to 3 feet high); within range reported from mountains, rocky slopes, forests and streambeds 5,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Rosaceae: The Rose Family

 

Agrimonia striata A. Michaux: Roadside Agrimony, Woodland Grooveburr (terrestrial perennial herb (to 6 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons,  rich soil in pine forests, meadows,  flats, roadsides, springs, creeks, rivers, along streams, gulches and watersheds 6,500 to 8,500 feet elevation)

 

Fragaria virginiana A.N. Duchesne subsp. glauca (S. Watson) G. Staudt (Fragaria ovalis (S. Watson) P.A. Rydberg): Strawberry, Virginia Strawberry (terrestrial perennial herb (4 to 8 inches high); within range reported from slopes, gulches and flats 7,000 to 11,000 feet elevation; the fruits are eaten by wildlife)

 

Holodiscus dumosus (T. Nuttall ex W.J. Hooker) F.X. Heller (Holodiscus discolor (F.T. Pursh) C.J. Maximowicz var. dumosus (T. Nuttall ex W.J. Hooker) C.J. Maximowicz ex T. Coulter): Bush Rock Spirea, Cream-bush, Foam-bush, Glandular Oceanspray, Mountain Spray, Ocean Spray, Rockspirea, Rush Rock Spirea, Shrubby Cream Bush (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub (to 10 feet in height); within range reported from mountains, cliffs and rocky slopes 5,500 to 10,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; browed by deer)

 

Rubiaceae: The Madder Family

 

Galium mexicanum K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth subsp. asperinum (A. Gray) L.T. Dempster (Galium asperinum A. Gray): Mexican Bedstraw (terrestrial perennial herb or vine; within range reported from mountains, among rocks and along streeambeds 4,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Galium microphyllum A. Gray: Bedstraw, Bracted Bedstraw (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from streambeds and along washes below 5,000 feet elevation)

 

Galium wrightii A. Gray: Rothrock Bedstraw, Wright’s Bedstraw (terrestrial perennial subshrub or shrub; within range reported from mountains, slopes, among rocks and along streambeds 3,500 to 8,500 feet elevation)

 

Houstonia wrightii A. Gray: Pygmy Bluet, Wright’s Bluets (terrestrial perennial herb (to 8 inches); within range reported from mountains, mesas, slopes and meadows 5,000 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

Salicaceae: The Willow Family

 

Populus tremuloides A. Michaux (var. aurea (Tidestrom) Daniels is the variety reported as occurring in Arizona): Alamo Temblon, Aspen, Golden Aspen, Quaking Asp, Quaking Aspen, Trembling Aspen, Trembling Poplar (terrestrial perennial deciduous tree (20 to 80 feet high); within range reported from mountains, plateaus, canyons, gravelly and sandy slopes, forests and along streams 6,500 to 10,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; pioneer tree on burned areas; leaves and stems are browsed by deer, elk and moose; beavers, rabbits and other animals feed on the bark, buds and leaves, beavers, grouse and quail feed on the winter buds)

 

Salix lasiolepis G. Bentham: Arroyo Willow, Narrowleaf Arroyo willow, White Willow (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub or tree (to 30 feet high); within range reported from mountains, foothills, valleys and along streams, arroyos and gullies 4,000 to 7,500 feet elevation)

 

Salix scouleriana J. Barratt ex W.J. Hooker: Black willow, Fire Willow, Mountain Willow, River Willow, Scouler’s Willow (terrestrial perennial deciduous shrub or tree (to 30 feet high); within range reported from mountains, slopes, forests and clearings in forests, ravines and along streams 7,000 to 10,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; a revegetation plant for burned areas in forests, aids in controlling erosion; browed by deer)

 

Saxifragaceae: The Saxifrage Family

 

Heuchera rubescens J. Torrey var. versicolor (E.L. Greene) M.G. Stewart (Heuchera versicolor E.L. Greene): Pink Alumroot, Red Alumroot, Slimfruit Alumroot (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, on boulders, among rocks and moist soils 6,500 to 12,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Heuchera sanguinea G. Engelmann: Alum Root, Coral Bells (terrestrial perennial herb (to 2 feet high), within range reported from hillsides and shaded moist rocky areas 4,000 to 8,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Philadelphus argenteus P.A. Rydberg (Philadelphus microphyllus) A. Gray: Jeringuilla, Mockorange, Silver Mock Orange, Syringa (terrestrial perennial shrub (to 4 feet high); within range reported from mountains, canyons, rocky slopes and ravines 5,000 to 9,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental; browsed by Bighorn Sheep)

 

Saxifraga eriophora S. Watson: Redfuzz Saxifrage (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, slopes, forests, recesses under boulders, among rocks, banks and in moist soils 5,000 to 8,500 feet elevation)

 

Scrophulariaceae: The Figwort Family

 

Castilleja austromontana P.C. Standley & J.C. Blumer: Rincon Mountain Indian Paintbrush (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons, rocky slopes, gulches, meadows and boggy areas 7,000 to 9,500 feet elevation)

 

Cordylanthus wrightii A. Gray: Club-flower, Wright’s Bird’s Beak (terrestrial annual herb; within range reported from mountains, mesas, rocky slopes, sandy plains, roadsides, along rivers and disturbed areas 5,000 to 7,500 feet elevation)

 

Mimulus cardinalis D. Douglas ex G. Bentham: Crimson-monkey Flower, Scarlet Monkeyflower (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains, canyons, seeps, springs, along steams and wet soils 2,000 to 8,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Mimulus guttatus A.P. de Condolle: Monkey-flower, Seep Monkeyflower, Yellow Monkey Flower (terrestrial annual or perennial herb; within range reported from moist sand in canyons, wet soil in seeps and springs, pools, along brooks and streams 500 to 9,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Penstemon barbatus (A.J. Cavanilles) A.W. Roth: Beard-lip Beard Tongue, Beardlip Penstemon, Golden-beard Penstemon, Hummingbird Flowers, Red Penstemon, Scarlet Penstemon, Southwestern Penstemon (terrestrial perennial herb (to 4 feet high); within range reported from mountains, rocky slopes, forests, woodlands and roadsides 4,000 to 10,000 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Solanaceae: The Potato Family

 

Solanum stoloniferum D.F. von Schlechtendal & P.C. Bouche: Nightshade (unable to locate in BONAP or NRCS Plants Database)

 

Violaceae: The Violet Family

 

Viola canadensis C. Linnaeus: Canada Violet, Canadian White Violet (terrestrial perennial herb (4 to 16 inches); within range reported from mountains, canyons, canyon bottoms, shaded slopes and banks, rich moist soil in coniferous forests and shaded areas, aspen grooves, meadows, gulches and beside streams 6,000 to 11,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Viola nephrophylla E.L. Greene: Kidney-leaf Violet, Meadow Violet, Northern Bog Violet, Wanderer Violet (terrestrial annual or perennial herb (to 6 inches); within range reported from mountains, slopes, forests, meadows, springs, streambeds, rich soils and moist and wet soils 5,000 to 9,500 feet elevation; useful as an ornamental)

 

Viola umbraticola K.S. Kunth in Humbolt, Bonpland and Kunth (var. glaberrima J. Becker is the variety reported as occurring in Arizona): Ponderosa Violet, Shade Violet (terrestrial perennial herb; within range reported from mountains at about 7,500 feet elevation)

 

Viscaceae: The Christmas Mistletoe Family

(Loranthaceae: The Mistletoe Family)

 

Arceuthobium douglasii G. Engelmann: Douglas Fir Dwarf Mistletoe (terrestrial perennial subshrub or shrub; parasitic on Pseudotsuga menziesii, Douglas-fir below 8,500 feet elevation)

 

Arceuthobium vaginatum (C.L. von Wildenow) J.S. Presl subsp. cryptopodum (G. Engelmann) F.G. Hawksworth and D. Wiens: Digger Pine Dwarf Mistletoe, Dwarf Mistletoe, Pine Dwarf Mistletoe, Pineland Dwarf Mistletoe, Southwestern Dwarf Mistletoe (terrestrial perennial subshrub or shrub; parasitic on Pines, Douglas-fir 5,500 to 9,000 feet elevation)

 

 

LISTING OF ANIMALS

 

 

AMPHIBIANS

 

Ranidae: Frogs

 

Rana yavapaiensis (Platz and Frost): Lowland Leopard Frog, San Felipe Leopard Frog, Yavapai Leopard Frog (feeds on small invertebrates; found in woodlands, chaparral, and grasslands in marsh habitats, springs, small to medium-sized streams and rivers, small ponds, and stock tanks being generally restricted to permanent and semi permanent waters often concentrating in deep pools in association with root masses of large riparian trees)

 

 

BIRDS

 

Accipitridae: Eagles, Hawks, Kites and Allies

 

Accipiter gentilis Linnaeus: Goshawk, Northern Goshawk (feeds on birds and mammals; nest is a platform of sticks located in tall trees)

 

Buteogallus anthracinus Deppe: Black Hawk, Common Black Hawk, Gavilon Negro Comun (Hispanic) (feeds on birds, crabs, fish, frogs, insects, rodents and snakes; nest is a platform of sticks lined with bark locate high up in cottonwood and mesquite trees)

 

Strigidae: Typical Owls

 

Strix occidentalis Xantus de Vesey subsp. lucida Nelson: Buho Manchado (Spanish), Mexican Spotted Owl, Spotted Owl, Tecolote Manchado Mexicano (Hispanic), Tecolote Moteado (Spanish) (feeds on small birds, insects, small mammals and reptiles; nests are located in canyon-wall caves and cavities, cliff caverns and ledges, rock hollows, tree cavities and abandoned hawk nests)

 

 

MAMMALS

 

Castoridae: Beaver

 

Castor canadensis Kuhle: American Beaver; Beaver; Beaver Castor (Hispanic) (found in aquatic habitats including creeks, streams, rivers, marshes, cienegas, ponds and lakes; feeds on bark, branches, buds, leaves or needles and twigs of alder, aspen, birch, cattail, cottonwood, maple, mesquite, tamarix and willow, and the roots of pond lilies and other tuberous plants; beaver dams help reduce erosion and provide habitat for other animals including otters and waterfowl; Beavers have been reported as having once been widespread in all of the permanent streams in Arizona, their distribution in Pima County is currently being investigated)

 

Cricetidae: Mice and Native Rats

 

Neotoma mexicana Baird: Mexican Wood Rat (feeds on acorns, berries including juniper berries, cacti, fungi, leaves and needles of green plants and nuts including pinyon nuts; nests are built in brush piles, buildings, cliffs, rock crevices, hollow trees and rock outcrops)

 

Sigmodon ochrognathus (V. Bailey): Rata Nariz Amarilla (Hispanic), Yellow-nosed Cotton Rat (nests are made of grass and plant fibers in agaves, beargrass, piles of dead leaves or in abandoned gopher burrows)

 

Phyllostomatidae: Leaf-nosed Bats

 

Choeronycteris mexicana (Tschudi): Hognose Bat, Mexican Hog-nosed Bat, Mexican Long-tailed Bat, Mexican Long-tongued Bat, Murcielago Lengua Larga Mexicano (Hispanic) (feeds on fruits, insects, nectar and pollen; found under bridges, and in shallow caves, rock fissures and mine tunnels)

 

Leptonycteris curasoae subsp. yerbabuenae (Martinez and Villa-R.) (Leptonycteris nivalis Saussure, Leptonycteris sanborni Saussure): Lesser Long-nosed Bat, Little Long-nosed Bat, Murcielago de Sanborn (Hispanic), Sanborn’s Long-nosed Bat, Sanborn’s Southern Long-nosed Bat, Southern Long-nosed Bat (feeds on nectar and pollen from Agave, Organpipe Cactus and Saguaro, pulp of Organpipe and Saguaro fruit and insects; found in old buildings, caves, rock crevices and abandoned mine tunnels)

 

Sciuridae: Squirrels and Allies

 

Sciurus arizonensis (Coues): Arizona Gray Squirrel, Grey Squirrel (feeds on acorns, berries, nuts, pine cones and seeds)

 

Ursidae: Bears

 

Ursus americanus (Baird) (Euarctos americanus (Pallus)): Black Bear, Oso Negro (feeds on acorns, ants, beetles, berries, buds, carrion, crickets, currants, fruit, grapes, grubs, insects, leaves, pinyon nuts, prickly-pear fruit, raspberries small to medium-size mammals and other vertebrates and twigs.

 

Ursus arctos (Linnaeus): Brown Bear, Grizzly Bear, Oso Gris (feeds on berries, carrion, fish, fungi, insects, leaves, mammals, roots and sprouts; reported from the Rincon and Santa Catalina Mountains and along the Santa Cruz River bottom from Nogales to Tucson. EXTIRPATED from Arizona)

 

Vespertilionidae: Plain-nosed Bats

 

Lasionycteris noctivagins (Le Conte): Murceilago Plateado, Silver-haired Bat (feeds on caddis flies, flies, moths and other insects; uncommon tree dwelling bat found in under bark, bird nests, dead trees, fissures in rock ledges, tree hollows, and woodpecker holes)

 

 

 

Listing Footnotes

 

(1) National Geographic Arizona Seamless USGS Topographic Maps. Maps created with TOPO! R C 2002 National Geographic.

               

(2) Walker, Henry P. and Don Bufkin. 1979. Historical Atlas of Arizona, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, Page 4A and Map.

 

(3) Richardson, M.L. and M.L. Miller. March 1974. United States Department of Agriculture - Soil Conservation Service in cooperation with the Pima County Natural Resource Conservation District, Report and interpretations for the General Soil Map of Pima County, Arizona and General Soil Map Pima County Arizona. Arizona General Soil Map, July 1975, United States Department of Agriculture - Soil Conservation Service and the University of Arizona Agricultural Experiment Station, compiled by J.E. Jay, Y.H. Havens, D.M. Hendricks, D.F. Post and C.W. Guernsey.

 

(4) Brown, David E., Biotic Communities of the American Southwest – United States and Mexico, Desert Plants, Volume 4, Numbers 1-4, Published by the University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum, 1982, and associated map: Brown, David E. and Charles H. Lowe, Biotic Communities of the Southwest, August 1980, General Technical Report RM-78, United Stated Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Revised June 1983

 

(5) Nomenclature generally follows that presented by The Biota of North America Program of the North Carolina Botanical Garden (BONAP) with A Synonymized Checklist of the Vascular Flora of the United States, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, Full Index 1998.

http://www.bonap.org/

http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/b98/check98.htm

 

(6) Growth habits generally coincide with that given by the National Plants Database. Common names identified in the database have been printed in bold lettering: USDA, NRCS. 2004. The PLANTS Database, Version 3.5 (http://plants.usda.gov). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA

 

 

 

Literature, References and Web Sites Cited, Consulted and Visited for Listings

 

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*Benson, Lyman and Robert A. Darrow. 1981. Trees and Shrubs of the Southwestern Deserts, The University of Arizona Press, Tucson, Arizona.

*The Biota of North America Program of the North Carolina Botanical Garden (BONAP) with A Synonymized Checklist of the Vascular Flora of the United States, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, Full Index 1998.

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*Biota Information System of New Mexico, New Mexico Game and Fish (BISON-M)

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*Brown, David E. 1982. Biotic Communities of the American Southwest – United States and Mexico, Desert Plants, Volume 4, Numbers 1-4, Published by the University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum, and associated map: Brown, David E. and Lowe, Charles H., Biotic Communities of the Southwest, August 1980, General Technical Report RM-78, United Stated Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station Revised June 1983.

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*Krausman, Paul R. and Michael L. Morrison. 2003. Wildlife Ecology and Management, Santa Rita Experimental Range (1903 to 2002), USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-30.2003 Pages 59 thru 67.

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*Little, Elbert L. 1980. The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Trees – Western Region, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, New York.

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*Maus, Kathryn. 12 October 2001. Plants of the West Branch of the Santa Cruz River, Arid Lands Resource Sciences, University of Arizona.

*McLaughlin, Steven P. July 18, 1990. Flora of Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge (including Arivaca Cienega), Office of Arid Land Studies, University of Arizona.

*Medina, Alvin L. 2003. Historical and Recent Flora of the Santa Rita Experimental Range, USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-30.2003 Pages 141 thru 148.

*Milne, Lorus and Margery. 1980. The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Insects and Spiders, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, New York.

*Minckly, W. L. 1973. Fishes of Arizona, Sims Printing Company, Inc., Phoenix, Arizona.

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*Pima County Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan Threatened and Endangered Species

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*Richardson, M.L. and M.L. Miller. March 1974. United States Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service in cooperation with The Pima County Natural Resource Conservation District, Report ands interpretations for the General Soil Map of Pima County, Arizona and General Soil Map Pima County Arizona.

*Rondeau, Renee, Thomas R. Van Devender, C. David Bertelson, Philip Jenkins, Rebecca K. Wilson, Mark A. Dimmitt. December, 1996. Annotated Flora of the Tucson Mountains, Pima County, Arizona, Desert Plants, Volume 12, Number 2..

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